Fishnhunt New Zealands main hunting and Fishing Forum. millions of posts on fishing and hunting, dogs, 4x4 vehicles, outdoors and much more Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 3  Send TopicPrint
Hot Topic (More than 30 Replies) Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3 (Read 5087 times)
Micky Duck
Donor Member
*****
Offline


You shot it..You pluck
it

Posts: 7886
Location: Geraldine South Canterbury
Joined: Dec 6th, 2013
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #15 - Jul 29th, 2019 at 7:05pm
Print Post  
https://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase/Hold+that+Forend.html

read it twice..... then when its soaked in read it again.
love him or hate him....the method wWORKS.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
johnv308
Active Member
**
Offline


Sika - The cunning buggers

Posts: 74
Location: Hamilton
Joined: Jun 8th, 2011
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #16 - Jul 30th, 2019 at 9:37am
Print Post  
I was having similar issues so ended up free floating the barrel (removed the two "tangs" located in the barrel channel about a third/half of the way down) and replaced the aluminium recoil lug with a stainless steel one. I did this because I had noticed some indentations in the aluminium one, which would have indicated a small amount of backward movement under recoil.

I had also read that to properly seat the action in the stock, was to initially tighten the action screws a bit over finger tight (enough to not easily move the action) and then seat the action hard up against the recoil lug by grasping the action and then "tapping" the end of the stock against the ground / hard surface so that the action is then forced hard up against the recoil lug. Then finally tighten the action screws - hopefully this makes sense.

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Trout
Donor Member
*****
Offline


Top NZ WhiteTail

Posts: 7750
Location: Southern Alps
Joined: Oct 4th, 2007
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #17 - Jul 31st, 2019 at 10:07am
Print Post  
Iv had a Tikka TX3 about 8 months.Just checked my 100yd zero the other day. Shooting off the bonnet of my patrol.Front end of stock rests on a small cushion and rear stock on small folded towel.
Dry fired 1st.My left hand placed on top of scope.
Squeezed off 1st shot,on dead centre of bull.
Second shot verticale on top of 1st just tounchn 1st shot.
Third shot just low left of bull eye 5mm from 1st shot.
All off this caus i replaced my zeiss with a second hand millet scope 4x16x50.My eyes getn bit blury so up the power rating.
Scope has 80 moa adjustment in elevation,so i have 60moa to use.Scope dials deadly accurate and is SFP.
Your tika will shoot one inch groups,you just gota practice in work it out.
The wee zeiss scope was very good too,shoot moa no trouble out to 500 yds,just my old eyes needed more magnification.
Everyday you shoot the same position,yr results could be slightly different.Tikkas barrels do warm up quickly.Fire 3 quick shots and let yr barrel cool for 10 minuts out of the sun.But wintery cold days with no wind are perfect.I just use factory ammo.I do clean barrel about every 20 shots.If you can shoot a lot of shots,say 10 in 10 minuts,your barrel will warm up and yr group will end up being 3 or 4 inchs,just wasting ammo.
Most Tikka Tx3 barrels are a hunting barrel,only designed for 1 or 3 shots in a morning hunt.No thick compitition barrels that can take a lot of heat.
Just practice, more visits to the range and less shots,keep barrel cool.Dont worry I don't shoot like this every day,but close.Used Belmont 150ssts,good ammo.


Good luck.
Oh theres a old saying(Chasing your scope)Beware of it. Wink
« Last Edit: Aug 3rd, 2019 at 6:08pm by Trout »  

Shot a few deer,caugth some big trout and salmon
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Trout
Donor Member
*****
Offline


Top NZ WhiteTail

Posts: 7750
Location: Southern Alps
Joined: Oct 4th, 2007
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #18 - Jul 31st, 2019 at 11:42am
Print Post  
Micky Duck wrote on Jul 25th, 2019 at 8:38pm:
get into position..get Xhairs on target...CLOSE YOUR EYES for 25 seconds..open your eyes...are you still on target??? it not you are muscling rifle the last bit to get on target...from a rest like you describe you should still be on target.I can do it off a rolled up swannie etc in damped prone.when sighting in you need to remove the human factor as much as possible.   oh and 2" at hundy is a dead deer out to 3 hundy so...dont sweat it too much.

+1 Wink
  

Shot a few deer,caugth some big trout and salmon
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Carlsen Highway
Forum Font
*****
Offline


I Love The FishNhunt Forum

Posts: 2483
Joined: Feb 7th, 2012
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #19 - Aug 5th, 2019 at 4:07pm
Print Post  
It sound like to me its just your shooting. The more you do shooting like this the better you will get at it.

I will give you some specific gaols to achieve with your shooting. This will be better for you than just trying to "shoot better".

(Will all respect to Mickey Duck, Nathan Foster ideas about holding the fore end of the rifle is the last thing you should be doing. Don't do it. I have to train people out of it before they can shoot well.)

If the 9X end of your scope is blurry at 100 metres, then your scope eyepiece is not focused properly. Turn the lens nearest your eye around until its not; Look at the furthest thing you can see sharply - horizon etc. Or for these purposes, just do that at the 100 metres target.

The aim of this exercise is to remove the shooters variable from the the shooting as much as possible so you can test the rifle and load. You do not have to be a "good" shooter for this. We are going to try and take you out of the equation. 

Bear in mind, its possible for an experienced man to shoot well by not following some of this because he knows what he's doing it and can compensate for it, or push through it for long enough to get a good shot away, but set yourself up this way.

Forget the bipod at the moment.

note that its harder to shoot a light rifle from a rest than a heavy one, so if you have a light Tikka T3 then try and bed yourself into a rest as I have described as best you can.

As for your rest, You must have a solid rest at front, - but also a solid rrest under the butt of the rifle. This is important, if you are holding the rifle up in the air at the back, just having a solid rest at the front is not enough.
The aim is to sit the rifle on a solid front and rear rest, put it on target, and then relax. If when you relax the crosshairs are not lined up properly at your target then you need to shift. And I mean, shift your self, not just the rifle. Wriggle to the left or the right. Shift yourself an inch this way or that,  until you are sitting behind the rifle, and when you relax, the crosshairs stay on target. You should not have to hold the rifle on target. You shouldn't be "aiming it".
(This is called the natural point of aim; it can also be described as "not f**king with the rifle." I used to think I invented it and used to call it that.)

Your right hand is your trigger hand and is the only with anything to do with shooting. If you find you are using muscle to hold you hand up so that you can get to the trigger, then put another rest again (third one)  underneath your right wrist or forearm.
Your left arm should come round underneath the butt of the rifle and either do nothing, or hold the rear rest in place, squeeze it make the rear rest go higher, whatever.

Your cheek weld is such that you shouldn't be holding your head up in the air. If the comb of the stock is too low to do this and you are using too much muscle to hold you head up to see through the scope, then get some tape and put a rest here, an inch of foam or anything will do. Or change your check weld so your putting you chin on the comb, whatever it takes to take muscle out out of it. Note that putting something on top of the comb often will cause you to turn your head, this may or may not be better for you, or you can get used to it. Its just for target shooting.
Your cheek weld and the weight of your head should be in the same spot on the butt each time - and it should be directly over the rear rest you use under the butt of the rifle.

Then your job is to press the trigger without upsetting the gun. Your trigger finger should be pressing squarely straight back. look at it, Sometimes what you think is pulling straight back isn't. You should be pressing with the middle of the pad on the last pad of your index finger. The bit you use to press elevator buttons.
The thumb of you right shooting hand can be wrapped around the pistol grip if you want, as long as you are not putting torsion or twisting the rifle one way or another when you hold it with your hand wrapped round the grip like that. If you're unsure them simply put your thumb on the tang of the pistol grip, behind the bolt; like you're pressing the trigger with pressure between your trigger finger and thumb.

Hold the right pistol grip firmly and put some pressure to bring the rifle but back into your shoulder so there is no gap. Try not to hunch your shoulder up into the rifle.


Look, read all this, then get behind the gun and get it all right, then sit there and think, what I am I using muscle to hold in place? Then change your position so your not.

You should be looking through the centre of the lens of your scope, not at the end or top. Move your head around until you can judge where the middle is.

Breathing: Don't hold your breath. Breath normally, exhale, and then just stop breathing until you've fired your shot. You have got a few seconds before you need to breath again, this is when you are shooting. Shoot this way each time.

If you're nervous, you might have to take a couple of breaths to have some air, and then you might have to deal with your heart beat. If you can feel your heartbeat thumping, or even see the cross hairs moving from your heartbeat, then you may have to just stay there for a while. Relax behind the gun in your shooting position. Breath mindfully, as the Buddhists say, until you are ready.

So when you've got it right, dry fire it. If the crosshairs end up somewhere else after the "shot" then your probably flinching a little bit, or your trigger pull is pulling the rifle one way or another slightly, or you are hunching your shoulder up into the rifle as you shoot (which is another way of flinching.)

Dry fire it again. Learn your trigger. Know when it goes off. Dry fire it a couple more times until you feel right.


Then shoot it.



(I was going to write  - Don't stress to much at getting the sights exactly right, Its hard to explain but what your doing will mean a better group than trying to get the cross hairs perfect. - but I wont. That is for when I start talking about using the force, which is the next stage.)

Let the rifle do what it wants to in its recoil. Accept the recoil, don't try and control it. be very Zen about it. Do not put your hand on the fore end for example. You cant stop a high powered rifle from recoiling as much as it wants to, but trying to do so will ruin your follow through, will make for a horrible shooting position, and put your attention where it shouldn't be.


Flinching. You may be flinching. Most people do to some extent or another. The key to this is to concentrate fully on doing everything right and deliberately not caring about the recoil or the noise. Wear good ear protection, this helps.
The rifle can't hurt you. Let it do what it wants when it goes off. Accept the recoil. Thank it for testing you, like a buddhist monk.

It's not part of your thinking when you're going to shoot. If you find yourself anticipating the rifle going off - getting ready for it to hit you - this is signaled by tensing up - then stop. Take a couple of breaths and start again. Forget what the gun is going to do. Its unimportant.

Targets - a decent target can actually make all the difference - Dont shoot at coloured things, or X's that match the cross hairs, or little dots - dont shoot at anything that you can't tell exactly where your cross hairs are intersecting.
Shoot at a black square with a white square in the middle. In other words, draw a black square on a peice of paper with a felt tip. About an inch and a half high. The lines of the square should be thick enough so that you end up with a white square in the middle of about an inch, and its dark enough you can see it clearly at 100 m through your scope.
It is easy to be very precise with your cross hairs layed over a black square - you divide the interior of the square into four parts with your cross hairs.

(Forget about parallax at this stage. But if you want to test it - line the rifle up on its rest aiming at the target - then without touching it at all, get behind it and love you eye from left to right while looking through the scope. Then up and down.
If you can see the crosshairs moving over the target to any degree then you have a paralax issue. When you move your head to the left for example, you might see the crosshairs slide an inch to the right. This is paralax. It means that when you do not hold your eye exactly behind the lens, that the cross hairs will be pointing in a diffrent place than if your looking through it striaght.
Paralaxx can be fixed easily on a Leupold scope, we can deal with it later if it appears. Forget it for the moment, because its perfectly possible to shoot well with some parallax error in your scope if you hold your head in the right place.)

None of this is witchcraft or hard to do. Its harder to write it. A couple of sessions at it and you will be better. If you can shoot from a bench or prone well like this, then don't take in pride in it, because it doesn t mean you are a good shooter. A good shooter can hit a moving deer in the right place offhand from an bolt half closed position before it's gone. A good shooter can hit a beer can in the air with an open sighted lever action rifle. Bench rest shooting is not the same thing. It's just a technical skill you need to master.

Mind that some days you're just going to be shooting badly. It happens. I don't know why. But if you follow what I am saying above, you will know when you're shooting badly. It wont be a mystery to you, so you wont think, oh, maybe my ammos not good anymore. Maybe my scope is wrong. Maybe it was th wind.

While we have mentioned wind, don't worry about wind at 100 metres unless you're shooting a .222, and even then only if its a cross wind. From front or back is not problem on a bullet.
But - the wind if its blustery will blow you around. I don't shoot on windy days if I can help it if I am testing a rifle.

Realistic accuracy expectations - for an big game hutning rifle 1.5 inch groups will do everything you ever wanted and is a good shooter.
I shoot rifles well and have many that will do less than an inch regularly. They are pretty looking targets and make you feel good, and you can show them to people, but a rifle that shoots 1.5 inch groups is just as deadly on deer as a rifle that shoots half inch groups.

To be honest two inch groups do not upset me either. Anything under two inches and you are in business as a hunter.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Micky Duck
Donor Member
*****
Offline


You shot it..You pluck
it

Posts: 7886
Location: Geraldine South Canterbury
Joined: Dec 6th, 2013
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #20 - Aug 5th, 2019 at 6:11pm
Print Post  
CH with all due respect read page 155...thats hunting type shooting...the first half of page 156 is range work...if you sight in one way and shoot the other...you could well expect TWO POINTS OF IMPACT as rifle isnt doing the same thing..... horses for corses.... we will have to agree to differ on this one Mate.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Carlsen Highway
Forum Font
*****
Offline


I Love The FishNhunt Forum

Posts: 2483
Joined: Feb 7th, 2012
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #21 - Aug 5th, 2019 at 6:25pm
Print Post  
I don't read anything he's written, for a number of reasons.

The OP wants to test his rifle and loads, thats the point of my post, I don't have space to do more and it will only be confusing for him.

At this stage for him none of that is relevant - he doesn't know if his rifle is shooting poorly or whether he is shooting poorly, and people have given him a number of things to test, that he can't do, because he doesn't know if it's his shooting.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Micky Duck
Donor Member
*****
Offline


You shot it..You pluck
it

Posts: 7886
Location: Geraldine South Canterbury
Joined: Dec 6th, 2013
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #22 - Aug 5th, 2019 at 7:25pm
Print Post  
I wasnt talking about what HE/N.F.  has written. Grin Grin Grin Grin
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Carlsen Highway
Forum Font
*****
Offline


I Love The FishNhunt Forum

Posts: 2483
Joined: Feb 7th, 2012
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #23 - Aug 5th, 2019 at 9:20pm
Print Post  
Micky Duck wrote on Aug 5th, 2019 at 7:25pm:
I wasnt talking about what HE/N.F.  has written. Grin Grin Grin Grin


LOL.  Grin You got me.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Micky Duck
Donor Member
*****
Offline


You shot it..You pluck
it

Posts: 7886
Location: Geraldine South Canterbury
Joined: Dec 6th, 2013
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #24 - Aug 6th, 2019 at 7:34pm
Print Post  
on ya Mate Grin Grin Grin
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bagheera
Forum Senior
****
Offline



Posts: 961
Location: Waikato
Joined: Jan 11th, 2010
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #25 - Aug 21st, 2019 at 9:41pm
Print Post  
On the range, the more magnification the better.  Your VX-2 will be up to it, while lesser scopes might not.

The VX-2 will have parallax zeroed at about 100m to help people get great groups on their sight in sessions and feel they've got a great scope and rifle.  So don't worry too much about that.  Just try and look fairly much down the centre of the lens and you'll be right.

Do try and set the focus correctly.  The adjustment ring only changes the crosshair.  You need to focus your eye for infinity eg think as if you're looking a kilometre away and don't stare too long.  Then adjust the focus to make the crosshair sharp.  It takes quite a few adjustments to get it right.

Three shot groups will vary enormously in size just by random fall of shots.  You can't really compare the accuracy of two ammunition or anything unless you shoot several 5 shot groups of each.    Most 3 shot groups will be considerably smaller than typical 5 shot groups.  So don't read to much into 1" vs 3" for 3 shots.

If you're taking it out of the stock, see if you can get a good tikka shooter to supervise putting it back together.  It can take a few shots to settle down.

I would say 2" at 100m is not bad for an average shooter with a light rifle using a bipod.  Don't waste too much ammo chasing small groups buy do try and get it well sighted in and test the drop on paper targets at longer ranges.

Smiley Smiley
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Good keen bloke
Full Member
***
Offline


I love my Tikka T3

Posts: 109
Location: Timaru
Joined: May 2nd, 2016
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #26 - Aug 23rd, 2019 at 11:02am
Print Post  
You need a cheek raise on your stock for eye to reticle repeatability & make your bulls eye smaller (approx half inche square to reduce error size) & keep your scope on 9 power with a good foundation under rifle (eg sand bags).
Thats what i do & gives me consistant results punching paper.
Oh & i sanded off the lug at front of stock, floated channel better & have a s/s recoil lug.
I also set my action screws religiously at 35in lb's front & back in my tikka t3x scoped with Leupold Vx2.
Good luck
  

7mil is the ultimate pill
Back to top
AIM  
IP Logged
 
Trout
Donor Member
*****
Offline


Top NZ WhiteTail

Posts: 7750
Location: Southern Alps
Joined: Oct 4th, 2007
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #27 - Aug 24th, 2019 at 8:24pm
Print Post  
Two shots in same hole.Went to the range last Monday just to check a couple of cold bore shots with the 308 TX3 at a hunred yds.1st n 2nd shots were touching centre a mm below cross hairs using Hornady 150 SSTs.Then I thort I try some FMJ 147gr cheapo ammo on a spot  about 200mm left of cross hairs.Second shot in 1st shots hole,hole 2mm wider.Oh both ammos within 3mm of same zero.
Go the TX3. Grin
  

Shot a few deer,caugth some big trout and salmon
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bagheera
Forum Senior
****
Offline



Posts: 961
Location: Waikato
Joined: Jan 11th, 2010
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #28 - Aug 26th, 2019 at 12:30pm
Print Post  
That's good first shot accuracy.  Photo ?

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
headcase
Global Forum Guide
Donor Member
*****
Offline


Former Youngest Person
in the World

Posts: 26925
Location: Ponsenby
Joined: Jul 9th, 2007
Gender: Male
Re: Sighting in and accuracy to expect from a Tikka TX3
Reply #29 - Aug 27th, 2019 at 3:33pm
Print Post  
Trout wrote on Aug 24th, 2019 at 8:24pm:
Two shots in same hole.Went to the range last Monday just to check a couple of cold bore shots with the 308 TX3 at a hunred yds.1st n 2nd shots were touching centre a mm below cross hairs using Hornady 150 SSTs.Then I thort I try some FMJ 147gr cheapo ammo on a spot  about 200mm left of cross hairs.Second shot in 1st shots hole,hole 2mm wider.Oh both ammos within 3mm of same zero.
Go the TX3. Grin


(on behalf of Trout)



  

“We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same.”
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 3 
Send TopicPrint
 

FishnHunt - New Zealands Famous Hunting and Fishing Forum Since 1995 » Powered by YaBB 2.6.11!
YaBB Forum Software © 2000-2020. All Rights Reserved.
Site Design By Alan Simmons - PRism and all rights are reserved from 1995 and onwards