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Normal Topic Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting (Read 1796 times)
elliotpower
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Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Jul 22nd, 2018 at 6:58am
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My wife and I just moved out of Auckland to the Bay of Plenty.

After doing a fly fishing and pig hunting (knife hunt) guided day trip two years ago Iíve wanted to give hunting a go, particularly deer hunting. Iíve signed up for a beginners HUNTS course through the BOP Deer Stalkers Club which begins tomorrow night.

However, my wife and more so my parents and my in laws are shit scared of having a rifle at home and me going out in the bush and going hunting. Not so much in fear of me doing something stupid as Iím patient and logical and calm in my thoughts, but other people out there that may shoot me by mistake, or a nephew coming to our house and finding the gun or a cleaning accident in the garage.

My wife isnít also so keen on me bringing carcasses home in the family station wagon and gutting in our suburban garage.

Join the fishing club or go surf casting down the road at Papamoa they have said.

Iím a bit of a bucket list type guy so would only go out on hunting trips with the club members on organised trips and once Iíve gone a few times Iím under the belief that I would have ticked it off and have run itís course for my hunting career but Iím not quite sure, I may get really into it and want to do it all the time.

Thoughts?
  
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jakkos
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #1 - Jul 22nd, 2018 at 7:26am
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Unfortunately there is not a lot we can do about the idiot factor. These are the few guys that fail to identify their target and pull the trigger. We can make ourselves visible in the bush. This at least will lessen the odds a bit. When you look at it really you have much more chance of being killed on the road as an innocent party than being shot at in the bush. The hunts programme..a good idea. A chance to meet a few other guys that are keen to go hunting, As for an accident at home or someone getting hold of your rifle. It will be locked away in a safe hopefully. with the bolt and ammunition stored separately. The safe keys in a place that you can be sure is at low risk of unauthorised people finding.
We all have to go though the firearm security thing. some resent it, but my opinion is that it is necessary. As for a carcass in your vehicle and butchering at home in the garage. Well the toughest problem to solve.. use her mothers car, and cut the meat up at your in-laws place Cheesy A good feed of prime venison might sway her a bit. Maybe someone in the deerstalkers club can help you out as well. First you have to find and shoot that deer Wink Good luck.
  

be good...And careful
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #2 - Jul 22nd, 2018 at 8:16am
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When you get your FAL and own firearms, they are required by law to be locked up, so your nephews arenít going to stumble upon them and shoot themselves.

People shooting themselves while cleaning their firearms is something you see in American tv shows, if you ensure your firearms are unloaded before doing anything else youíll never have an issue.

If you shoot a deer you can break down the carcass in the bush, I donít know why bringing it home would be such an issue but you donít have to.

Hunting fatalities happen maybe 5 times a year. But when you consider that there are 10,000s if not 100,000s of hunters, making multiple trips, the odds of getting shot, let alone seeing someone else off the track, are very slim. Also, youíre statistically more likely to be shot by your hunting partner, and in the roar, so pick your partner/times carefully.

And the clincher - your chances of being killed fishing or driving to your hunting spot are higher than your chances of being killed while hunting.
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #3 - Jul 22nd, 2018 at 8:29am
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You're more likely to die in a car accident on your way to the beach fishing or drown when you get there.
  

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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #4 - Jul 22nd, 2018 at 9:00am
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I hear you......the concern of relatives simply means they love you and dont understand. your task/job/problem is how to re-educate them without falling out or having to sleep in dog kennel.

the next time someone says "its not safe to have those dangerous things in the house" take the car keys and park all auto mobiles down the road and keep keys in your pocket......after all the car is involved in far more fatalities each week Cry or suggest you need to do so Wink
car boot liners are less than $50 and as has been said above,break carcase down out in the boonies and carry out what you are going to eat,the dog will appreciate 2-3 leg bones and any skin you choose to leave on will go in otto bin.
funny they suggest fishing is safer...2 drowned swept of rocks this month and boats have been known to sink..... they are trying to deflect you from what it is you want to do,the HUNTS course will be a great start,nato blue polar fleece stands out like doggy danglies and a combination of different blaze colours means you can wander around looking like a chernoble glow worm,it should make them at home feel better Wink
heres a cunning thought.......if in laws are so concerned about your safety and claim thats the reason they anti you doing this,suggest they buy you/pay for a couple of behind wire/safari block meat animal hunts so you can wet your feet/scratch the itch/try before you buy into the whole shebang,you will end up with animal/meat to cook to perfection so they hanging out for more and will gain a LITTLE knowledge from outing in a safe user friendly enviroment..... you wont need your own rifle to do that option as most will be able to provide one ...... it would probably work out cheapest/safest way to find out if it is as you say just a box ticking that will fade .
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #5 - Jul 22nd, 2018 at 9:43am
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another way to put the risks of being shot into perspective is to use driving as comparison.
if driving at night in the rain around central city after big test match when pubs have closed is high risk....dont do it
at that time in that area,and if you do...make sure to drive carefully with head lights on and be very aware of other vechiclles on road and assume everyone else is a pissed moron.... you should get down to garage for your bottle of milk and home again fine.

MOST hunting incidence occur during the rut/roar period when lots of people are out in hills all hyped up trying to shoot a stag

dont hunt during the roar or if you do

where high vis,hunt open country if possible,stay quiet,DONT seperate from hunting mates NO MATTER WHAT if moving in on wounded animal.and be cautious about who you choose to hunt with.

hope that helps.
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #6 - Jul 22nd, 2018 at 10:33am
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Yep as others have said the most dangerous part of hunting is driving to the end of the road.  Smiley
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #7 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 12:33pm
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Eliotpower, Can understand being wary of other hunters.
as said, the risk is low.
But, the fact that many hunters avoid popular spots for hunting, and even stay out of public land tells you that in fact, a lot of hunters do think theres a significant risk

comparisons with driving arnt really relevant. stalking the bush, worrying about being shot isn't worth it.

I avoid those places.  I don't hunt roadends, and avoid any other hunters, if I can. means walking a long way into the backcountry, usually. (then the helicopterered hunters arrive!)

My advice is, don't go to the highly used places. If only to ease your peace of mind (and your family's)
especially in the Roar.
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #8 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 2:36pm
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Yep avoid the roar for sure.
Wear blaze blue or orange.
Or do what I do.  Spend most of your hunting time in the East Coast Alps.   Wide open spaces and comparatively few people that can be buggered getting to where I go.
Carry an EPIRB.
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #9 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 5:50pm
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This is a fantastic post and I love philosophical discussions like this.

Does hunting come with some risk?  Sure but consider that one of the most deadly hobbies is fishing off rocks and they suggested that as an alternative?

Is there a very very small chance that you will be the victim of a hunting accident?  Sure but the answer to that one is to get life insurance (wife suddenly wants you to go) and that you are more at risk driving a car.  Think about it, how high is the road toll?  500 people a year?  On a good year the amount of people killed in hunting accidents is 0.

Will you kill yourself cleaning your rifle?  Not if it's not loaded and then it's entirely possible to kill yourself working on a car as well and you can't unload those.

Will a nephew accidentally kill themselves with your gun?   Not if it's locked up and also unloaded.  In fact owning a gun lowers the risk because you can show it to them (under supervision), demonstrate safe handling and then lower the risk of them shooting themselves with someone elses gun.

I could go on but all this comes down to fear and paranoia about an activity thats safer than many things we do daily.  Fear normally comes from the unknown and ignorance.  If you have rationally thought this through and signed up to a HUNT course as the first step on this road then you are not the part of the population at most risk from a hunting accident.

My final (non PC) line is to man up a bit and affirm your manly cultural right to roam around the hills with the power to kill like Barry Crump did.  It's part of what makes us Kiwis, don't let anyone rob you off this.

Also don't get her to help you chop up any dead things.  This responsibility sits firmly with you.
  

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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #10 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 6:23pm
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T.H. my comparison with driving was an attempt to show how any activity has risk and at certain times the risk is higher...change the time frame and how you do something can reduse that risk no end....I agree 100% that being at risk and worried about it isnt worth doing..... take care out there.
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #11 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 6:33pm
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Micky Duck wrote on Jul 23rd, 2018 at 6:23pm:
T.H. my comparison with driving was an attempt to show how any activity has risk and at certain times the risk is higher...change the time frame and how you do something can reduse that risk no end....I agree 100% that being at risk and worried about it isnt worth doing..... take care out there.


I understand the comparison MD. its correct.  Smiley
To me,  I don't want to be anywhere near the very few (I hope) who are the careless ones . low probability or nor

Ashfisherman has it right, stay on the tops. don't think anyone has been shot up there, yet. (I think)
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #12 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 6:54pm
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All the other contributors have basically given best advice, the only other thing you could do is post Asking if someoneís prepared to take you for a walk and teach some bush skills such as maps, fire lighting and shelters
  

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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #13 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 7:05pm
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Get into bow hunting.
Get a bow that little jimmy canít pull back.
Wear heaps of camo - canít shoot you if they canít see you.
  
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Re: Hunting safety and family concerns- brand new to hunting
Reply #14 - Jul 23rd, 2018 at 7:22pm
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You have some work to do with your wife, if she is scared of having a firearm in the house you probably won't get a firearms license.
An unloaded firearm with the bolt removed is really just a high precision pipe and is totally safe - unless you drop it on your foot!
The Mountain Safety Council have a good report on accidents and deaths from hunting, you should be able to find it on their website. It is really good at showing what the risks are, then you can work on how to make your family more comfortable by reducing those risks.
  
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