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Very Hot Topic (More than 100 Replies) The changing face of hunters and hunting (Read 8311 times)
Sneaka
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The changing face of hunters and hunting
May 23rd, 2018 at 7:54pm
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It will be interesting to hear peoples thoughts on this. I have been hunting for thirty plus years. In the last five to ten years I have noticed a real shift in the way people hunt and think about it. There seems to be a lack of desire to work at and improve hunting/ stalking skills these days. People instead seem to be trying to improve their success rate by dipping in to their pockets and buying more/ newer gear and tech etc. We seem to have become very materially based and less focussed about the stuff that actually matters and makes a difference. I don't see much hunting clothing that looks worn out any more now either. I am also seeing a whole raft of big game hunters who have never put a pack on their backs and walked in to the mountains for a number of days to live on what they have with them. It never used to be like that. Sure there are a lot of deer on farm land these days but are we getting more and more detached from what it actually means to be a hunter and to hunt? And everyone seems to be buying and carrying great big scopes and rifles around to be able to shoot deer at long range. I have shot thousands of animals in my life and while it is good to be prepared, we all seem to be focussing on the 1% of times where a longer shot might actually be needed. 99% of the time you can stalk closer. Isn't that half the fun of the hunt? The challenge? Deer that stay in the bush these days are pretty safe. I saw a great You Tube clip recently where a big stag ran straight at the hunter in the bush after a killing shot was made, before it keeled over. The camera man made the comment " You don't get excitement like that at 500 yards". Now each to their own I say, but I am seeing a real culture shift where NZ hunters seem to becoming more and more like American hunters. I am not worried by this but I find it interesting.
  
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Rumpy
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #1 - May 23rd, 2018 at 8:21pm
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Probably right what you are saying Sneaka but for me the adventure of the hunt is half of the reason I do it. Getting out for a good walk and getting away from civilisation is a big part of hunting for me. I have to admit that getting out into the bush for more than a 3 day stint is a bit hard to wrangle with work and family commitments but being out in the hills is my happy place.
  

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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #2 - May 23rd, 2018 at 8:25pm
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The shift of skills has certainly changed probably due to the numbers of animals on private country and open conservation areas.
Many hunters have never really had to learn to actually hunt properly and have really developed as shooters rather than hunters.
Hunting in the bush demands quite a different set of skills to that of open country but each has its own challenges in different ways.
The popularity has certainly grown immensely probably due to the increased numbers of deer, social media, marketing by retailers and hunting shows on tv. 
  

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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #3 - May 23rd, 2018 at 8:26pm
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Have been hunting for forty plus years and would tend to agree with you.There seems to be a trend of needing the latest bit of gear to maximize your chances of success, such as having rifles set-up to take game at long range. Sure, there is skill involved in achieving long range killing shots,but what's happened to the idea of using real stalking skills and getting up close and personal with your intended target? The same applies with camo gear,there is still more game shot by hunters wearing whatever clothes they happen to have. The reality is that movement gives you away more times than any other reason. Get back to basics.Use whatever firearm you can afford which fits you correctly and wear clothing that is comfortable and keeps you as warm/cool as you require and preferably dry.Get out there and enjoy the pursuit, you don't have to be successful all the time in regard to bagging game.
  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #4 - May 23rd, 2018 at 9:34pm
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I am in my mid-30's  and started hunting just couple years ago. Bought rifle older than me and bit of a gear like binos and GPS, nothing too fancy or new, all second-hand. Made about 20 trips so far and shot just a handful of animals, most of them on private land and all for meat, nothing was wasted. My real passion although is stalking in the bush for red deer.
Everyone around me says that its a hard work and I should rather head up to the open country..  Tongue But hunting in open country doesn't require that much of a skill I think. When I sneak through the bush, walk along the deer trail and try to read all signs I feel like I am really hunting, its something primal and I love it.  Cool
  

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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #5 - May 23rd, 2018 at 9:44pm
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Dont get me started...
  

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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #6 - May 23rd, 2018 at 9:47pm
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Interesting discussion. My view: - to compare contemporary practises with those of perhaps 45+ years ago is to stand up a whole raft of criteria from those days against todays situation.
For example, when I bought my first high velocity centrefire (Alpine .308) at 15 years of age (that rifle is still my primary go-to rifle), it wasnt even drilled or tapped for a scope. Most first rifles for all young lads was still a sporterised SMLE and many were of questionable use if shooting beyond 100yds.
Most families were single wage-earner and single car (if they had a car). Very few young folk owned their own vehicle so transportation was wherever public transport could take you - noting that firearm carriage on public transport or hitch-hiking with a bare rifle over the shoulder was quite acceptable back then).
Clothing was normal work clothing (limited to Norsewear, Swandri, and a couple other minor brands, and a lot of ex-Army clothing - all limited to natural fibres (cotton or wool or blend of both) - no synthetics and base-layer wool was always scratchy for the first few hours  Angry
Footwear was Bullers or John Bulls for the majority of us.
We all knew how to get a fire going - lightweight fuel cookers were a rarity.
Most households didnt have technology beyond a single party-line phone and a single HUGE  Grin 18 inich (diagonal measure) B&W TV - TV that (if you had reception) only transmitted about 5 hours a day on 3 x channels!
Very few people were reloading back in those days - and chamberings available were in the main, not "wildcat" but mainstream. Sako was nearly the only non-British make of rifle readily sold around the country - but they were pricey.
Private Hunting Blocks run on a commercial basis are a relatively new development.
The internet didn't exist so we were restricted to selecting from the offerings that every little town sports shop held in stock - and we couldnt then "google" the best price round the country either.
Back in the 70's and 80's the choppers waged a war on deer that had incredible impact - very seldom were deer seen in mobs outside of a farmer's turnip paddock on the back boundary in those days. The change in many farmers' attitude to deer when Live Capture kicked in was amazing to view too - my farmer cousin in the Paraparas changed overnight from his monthly calls of "get up here and shoot these lawn-mowers" to "nar mate - I've got them sorted now - nothing to see here mate - sorry" and he was picking up $500/head from a contracted chopper crew. (Can't blame him).
The young ones of today view the opportunities that exist now through a far different lens - pressure from their technology-bearing devices all pumping messages - blatant advertising, U-Tube, Social networks etc . . .
and the poor bugas dont seem to be able to put those devices down or be without them for a minute (sickness).
Both parents work, time seems to be the most valuable commodity - so anything to be done has to be achievable in a very short time. No leisurely entire weekend hunts - for some folk now, normalised "hunting" is now out in the car with a couple mates, quick cruise up some country roads, spotlight the roadside, crowing in the pub (or at school) next day over your hunting prowess . . . sad.
So yep - times have changed - and those of us who have been around for a while might reflect on how we each may have adapted too.
I have - my rifles are scoped, I have purpose-made clothing which is more practical and appropriate, a GPS, a PLB, and a proper SWAZI Buffalo Pikau instead of my old spud-sack with rope straps  Smiley
Plus I fly in-out to places that once took me about 14 hours each way - they would now take me 2 full days each way and I've not got the additional time to lose walking (plus I'd now be stuffed once I got there).
Keep this thread going - there is no end to people's views on this subject.
  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #7 - May 23rd, 2018 at 9:58pm
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Alan wrote on May 23rd, 2018 at 9:44pm:
Dont get me started...
                   


Ha, ha, ha - nuff said.
  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #8 - May 23rd, 2018 at 10:28pm
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Only noticed a few things different from a  few decades ago, clothing is cheaper and lighter and so many more animals around even an idiot can stumble over a couple.

Hauhungaroa base camp in the early 70s wollen clothing.


Te Puke exposure around 30 yrs ago now wearing Swandri (still wool) and now carrying everything around in a new lightweight Fairy Down pack.



  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #9 - May 24th, 2018 at 9:14am
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I blame the Duley's and their sponsers... Cheesy :
  

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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #10 - May 24th, 2018 at 9:48am
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Gazcan wrote on May 24th, 2018 at 9:14am:
I blame the Duley's and their sponsers... Cheesy :


Smiley
Think you can blame the TV shows and Magazines, Gazcan
Dunno bout the Duleys though, at least they walk and do the so called hard yards
Sponsors drive everything, so we get bombarded with the latest fads in gear, clothing
No different in the rest of life.
When only NZ Outdoor, (or was it Rod And Rifle) existed in the 60s,  never got conned into all the junk gear.
And hunting stories were about real hunts.
Now half the game appearing in magazines and on TV is on private farms.
To many deer on the farms, so hunters go there instead of doing a bit of hard walking

But its like everything else, everything has to be done quicker, easier and you have to dress the part.
its technology
I blame Bill Gates Roll Eyes
  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #11 - May 24th, 2018 at 10:08am
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There's adventure hunting and there's shooting.  Two completely different things.

Cheers Dan
  

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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #12 - May 24th, 2018 at 10:47am
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and what about the need to plaster photos all over facebook, seems to be a compulsory requirement if shot in a paddock or on crop.
  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #13 - May 24th, 2018 at 10:59am
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Ha Ha we are all becoming our fathers,i can remember my Dad going on about farm bikes versus shanks pony/walking.Grumpy old men..."in my day ".....
  
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Re: The changing face of hunters and hunting
Reply #14 - May 24th, 2018 at 11:51am
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I figure its useful to ask whether hunting is changing in ways that are similar or different to other activities, and I think not so much?

For example, recreational fishing from boats now seems (maybe?) even more reliant on technology than hunting. GPS, instead of lining up the old man pine tree with that knob on the ridge? Then using the sounder to find the rock, and even the fish?

sar wrote on May 24th, 2018 at 10:59am:
Ha Ha we are all becoming our fathers,i can remember my Dad going on about farm bikes versus shanks pony/walking.Grumpy old men..."in my day ".....



Yep, and this, too.
« Last Edit: May 24th, 2018 at 7:15pm by Max »  
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