Fishnhunt New Zealands main hunting and Fishing Forum. millions of posts on fishing and hunting, dogs, 4x4 vehicles, outdoors and much more Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Page Index Toggle Pages: [1] 2  Send TopicPrint
Normal Topic teaching range (Read 4813 times)
montydon
Just Joined
*
Offline


New Zealand's Hunting
and Fishing Forum

Posts: 6
Location: uk
Joined: Aug 30th, 2016
teaching range
Aug 31st, 2016 at 7:05am
Print Post  
Hi folks I have a 2 1/2 year old grey hound cross used for rabbit. He is not too bad but does work a bit further ahead than I would like. I saw Paul Michels blueprint and decided to try the long line. His been on it 2-3 months and I rarely have to turn him and he behaves perfect on it. Last night just to test him I took it and immediately he new he was free. His movement was free and his attitude in general just perked up and he started to range a bit further ahead than he would on the line so I put him straight back on.
So if a dog is long line wise how do you get around this. My line is light cord about 15 metres and he sticks with in about 10 where I want with it on. But even a light cord has drag.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
LOVETT
Forum Font
*****
Offline


Hunting the Kaweka, Ruahine
& Tararua Forest Parks

Posts: 2204
Location: Wanganui & Wairarapa
Joined: Jun 15th, 2010
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #1 - Aug 31st, 2016 at 8:33am
Print Post  
I spoke about range control with another guy for three hours on Saturday to my girlfriends absolute disgust  Grin Grin Grin

From my observation range control is the top end of dog handling.  Particularly doing it non-verbally.

Tricky to explain but for the method you need a stop and turn command.

Even then I am not sure I am well written enough to spit it out in a fashion you'd understand.

Dan

  

YOU'LL LEARN NO HARM FROM THE HILLS - NEWTON MCCONOCHIE
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
montydon
Just Joined
*
Offline


New Zealand's Hunting
and Fishing Forum

Posts: 6
Location: uk
Joined: Aug 30th, 2016
Re: teaching range
Reply #2 - Aug 31st, 2016 at 8:48am
Print Post  
I have a stop whistle and if i whistle twice and turn he follows unless he thinks i am going home lol
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
LOVETT
Forum Font
*****
Offline


Hunting the Kaweka, Ruahine
& Tararua Forest Parks

Posts: 2204
Location: Wanganui & Wairarapa
Joined: Jun 15th, 2010
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #3 - Aug 31st, 2016 at 8:13pm
Print Post  
The whistle is a good start.

Always difficult to explain because the range control is the icing on the cake.  But the cake needs to be baked properly  Grin

Dan
  

YOU'LL LEARN NO HARM FROM THE HILLS - NEWTON MCCONOCHIE
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Nomads
Donor Member
*****
Offline


Angler, hunter, gardener,
cook

Posts: 620
Location: North
Joined: Aug 12th, 2014
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #4 - Sep 1st, 2016 at 9:48pm
Print Post  
Well, if/when you have time, I'd love to read some input on this....

I have range control issues in certain terrains (more open grass etc) and a whistle to stop, which does work, is not always appropriate when after certain game.

cheers
  

Like a cane chair at a nudist camp, always leave an impression.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
wac
Donor Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 325
Location: Chch
Joined: Nov 18th, 2010
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #5 - Sep 6th, 2016 at 2:25pm
Print Post  
Great topic and hopefully a few more people jump in on this.

From my very limited experience with my dog, range control is more about the teamwork and hunting together than anything else. I think it is largely how the dogs sees the hunt and its success in that hunt as to what range it will go to. Having said that i established the range very early before we encountered game (birds in this case) so she only had success at this range and so sticks to it as thats how shes thinks we will be successful in the hunt.

Montydon how would a typical rabbit hunt go? Where and how do you want the dog ranging? Is it an indicate or flush the rabbit type of deal?  That may be great info for some others to come in and help you out as i know nothing about rabbit hunting with a greyhound (although it sounds pretty awesome).

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Micky Duck
Donor Member
*****
Offline


You shot it..You pluck
it

Posts: 7073
Location: Geraldine South Canterbury
Joined: Dec 5th, 2013
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #6 - Sep 6th, 2016 at 6:27pm
Print Post  
I believe the trick is to retrain dog to be "comfortable" inside your desired area/distance.
my bitch has been kept in close right from the word go so she keeps within that 20 mtr range as matter of habit, a short quiet single whistle or grrrrr will stop her/make her wait..... it seems she has figured out its easier to stop and wait than to piss the boss off by mucking around and going too far, no problem to put her back on lead when pressure is on and doing so seems to reinforce what is desirable ..behave= stay loose/muck around= back on lead.

greyhounds are born to run and chase down game so you are up against it trying to keep them in.

hope that helps.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
montydon
Just Joined
*
Offline


New Zealand's Hunting
and Fishing Forum

Posts: 6
Location: uk
Joined: Aug 30th, 2016
Re: teaching range
Reply #7 - Sep 7th, 2016 at 11:30pm
Print Post  
when we enter field or work a wood or what ever he is expected to go ahead 15-20 yards and keep to my pace scenting as he goes covering the ground. If he winds some thing then he can go thats fine. In fairness he is not to bad and can vary between 10 40 yards but if there is a lot of scent around then he will start zooming around every where.  So I just wanted more control in general and since using the line on him things are going well. Putting in a turn if he goes to far. He rarely needs it now and I can turn him on a whistle or stop him. But he knows his on a line. I have tested him and the training has carried over off line but he just knows lol. I thinks its just a work in progress and if I stick at it we will get there  Smiley
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
LOVETT
Forum Font
*****
Offline


Hunting the Kaweka, Ruahine
& Tararua Forest Parks

Posts: 2204
Location: Wanganui & Wairarapa
Joined: Jun 15th, 2010
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #8 - Sep 8th, 2016 at 6:52am
Print Post  
Here's what I was shown, requires a turn and stop.

There is an emphasis on using your environment.  The dog associates a particular setting with a chosen distance.

Teaching a deer stalking distance I do my training in a tight environment.  As the dog advances beyond your distance turn 180 degrees and use your turning whistle, dog then turns and follows.  Repeat as necessary.  If the dog isn't taking notice use your stop at the said distance and advance past the stooped dog releasing when you advance to the chosen distance.

I would be taking the lead on and off never letting the dog go beyond the distance in that environment. 

I'm not sure that even makes sense... I find the process mentally taxing.  5 minute sessions.

The practice is bloody difficult.  What I've explained is saying just tackle Lomu around the legs. 

It was mentioned to me that this is bloody difficult.  Once mastered you can override the association with the environment and apply where needed.

Cheers, Dan

  

YOU'LL LEARN NO HARM FROM THE HILLS - NEWTON MCCONOCHIE
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
montydon
Just Joined
*
Offline


New Zealand's Hunting
and Fishing Forum

Posts: 6
Location: uk
Joined: Aug 30th, 2016
Re: teaching range
Reply #9 - Sep 8th, 2016 at 9:07am
Print Post  
I have noticed what you say about the environment. In some places he works closer and others tends to range ahead.
So I assume in between these session you make sure the dog is on a line to keep things consistent ?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
LOVETT
Forum Font
*****
Offline


Hunting the Kaweka, Ruahine
& Tararua Forest Parks

Posts: 2204
Location: Wanganui & Wairarapa
Joined: Jun 15th, 2010
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #10 - Sep 8th, 2016 at 9:29am
Print Post  
During the teaching phase remove the dog from the tight environment when you are not wanting the close range. 

I am not convinced I have explained well enough.

End product should be that when you hit the tight stuff your hound defaults to close range. 

Dan
  

YOU'LL LEARN NO HARM FROM THE HILLS - NEWTON MCCONOCHIE
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Kawhia
Forum Font
*****
Offline


I Love The FishNhunt Forum

Posts: 3538
Joined: May 11th, 2010
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #11 - Sep 9th, 2016 at 9:33am
Print Post  
am i right in assuming this dog is used as a lurcher ?
  

"Pedigree indicates what the animal should be. Conformation indicates what the animal appears to be. Performance indicates what the animal actually is."
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
montydon
Just Joined
*
Offline


New Zealand's Hunting
and Fishing Forum

Posts: 6
Location: uk
Joined: Aug 30th, 2016
Re: teaching range
Reply #12 - Sep 9th, 2016 at 7:01pm
Print Post  
Kawhia wrote on Sep 9th, 2016 at 9:33am:
am i right in assuming this dog is used as a lurcher ?


yes that is right
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
jonesy45
Active Member
**
Offline


I Love The FishNhunt Forum

Posts: 64
Joined: May 8th, 2015
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #13 - Sep 18th, 2016 at 8:22am
Print Post  
There are a few different methods for range and it's just up to finding what works for you.  The only thing I can say is don't give them an inch or they will take a mile. Be very consistent, any chance they get to push the boundrys they will.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fullchoke
Donor Member
*****
Offline


Its good at the top of
the food chain

Posts: 323
Location: Cambridge
Joined: Dec 23rd, 2006
Gender: Male
Re: teaching range
Reply #14 - Apr 29th, 2017 at 2:16pm
Print Post  
Some great comments here its something I'm about to do. I have a 3/4 Vizsla 1/4 border collie coming up 4 months. Proving a smart dog at this young age and hopefully easily trained. From what I understand they're not a breed to stray too far but I really want to nail this range control down. I have had a couple of goes with a long lead but as I live in town I think there are too many distractions especially with other dog scent around. Also when a pup just needs to get some energy out after being at home all day I didn't feel it was the best time...Standing on a long line while she is running around with the line potentially wrapped around her back leg... so I figured it would be best to do any more range training once I get into an appropriate 'environment' as mentioned previously.
Any comments on this would be great - do you think there is any problem ignoring range while walking in town? Is there a critical age I should be teaching range by, or is it ok to wait until I have time in a suitable environment?
Cheers
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: [1] 2 
Send TopicPrint
 

FishnHunt - New Zealands Famous Hunting and Fishing Forum Since 1995 » Powered by YaBB 2.6.11!
YaBB Forum Software © 2000-2018. All Rights Reserved.
Site Design By Alan Simmons - PRism and all rights are reserved from 1995 and onwards