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Poll closed Question: Competition Voting for the best Roar Story. Youll find them in the Hunting Reports. Only members, and you can vote for more than one story.
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High Country Boys "ballot trip into the landsborough river"    
  24 (17.6%)
Stugs "Back to Basics"    
  27 (19.9%)
Mike B and "A Trophy Fallow"    
  11 (8.1%)
RuahineRowans "Cutting Teeth: First Sika Roar"    
  28 (20.6%)
RuahineRowans "Easter weekend Ruahine roar trip with dad. "    
  18 (13.2%)
meathunter72 "My Roar"    
  8 (5.9%)
Stretch and "Longwinded yarn"    
  3 (2.2%)
footsore "Roar Hunt"    
  8 (5.9%)
Mad_Fisho s roar story.    
  9 (6.6%)




Total votes: 136
« Last Modified by: headcase on: Aug 24th, 2016 at 10:02am »
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Hot Topic (More than 30 Replies) A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition. (Read 14331 times)
headcase
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A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Jun 8th, 2016 at 5:37am
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No rules to speak of as yet. No photo required if you cant post one. Must be believable though.  Grin or email me a pic and I can insert it.

Some good prizes too as yet been donated and finalized.

We already have this from X-POACHER-YEAH RYT (who is 92 this year, unbelievable. )
2x $100 petrol vouchers for initial prizes, plus 3x Bahco supersharp blades for the 3 worst/ hardluck entries

Nik Maxwell donates a one year sub to New Zealand Guns and Hunting

The Heart of Hunting  donated by Alan
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TJ is offering a stock and blueing job.

A pair of Yukon Point Roof Prism Binoculars 8x42 from HC
« Last Edit: Sep 20th, 2016 at 2:24pm by Alan »  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #1 - Jun 8th, 2016 at 8:32am
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Ill organise some prizes tomorrow....
A
  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #2 - Jun 8th, 2016 at 8:38am
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Some good prizes to as yet be donated and finalized.

We already have this from X-POACHER-YEAH RYT (who is 92 this year, unbelievable. )
2x $100 petrol vouchers for initial prizes, plus 3x Bahco supersharp blades for the 3 worst/ hardluck entries

Didn't your mum tell you? "Don't believe everything that you read on the 'net"  Wink Grin

C'mon you hunters, punters, and others... start posting.  Smiley
  

Get as close as you can, then get a bit closer.
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #3 - Jun 8th, 2016 at 8:47am
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After last year I won't be posting in here.  But I have got some roar footage that I need to edit and post.  Good on you X poacher.  You are a good bastard.
  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #4 - Jun 9th, 2016 at 6:55am
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Thought I'd get the ball rolling. Here's my recount of my recent roar ballot trip into the landsborough river.
Enjoy!

After me and my mates got our firearms license we decided that we should have a crack at the roar ballot. After sending in all our applications we got the lucky letter in the mail saying we were successful in getting McLennan creek in the lower Landsborough valley. The next six months were comprised of excitement, constant scouting of the block and squeezing any information out of photos and google earth that we could.

A month prior to our balloted week me and my dad had a bit of a scout into our block to look at sign, check the track though the notorious struts bluff and find a suitable campsite. This went realitively well as we managed to find all three. This scout only added to the excitement.

The night before we went in one of my mates pulled out because of rugby commitments so we were down to a three man team but we still got into it. Setting off from the truck was a surreal feeling as six months of planning had come together. We battled hard through struts bluff with our twenty kilo packs on. If you have not been over it imagine a sheep track that climbs up about one hundred meters then brings you down a steep and greasy face with nothing to hold on to which in places there was twenty meter drops straight into the landborough. The climb is rather frustrating as it takes about one hour hindered with giant packs and only gains you about 400 meters.

We trudged our way up the remaining 5 km of river flats in a rather uneventful tramp to our campsite at the end of the Harper flat airstrip. We got straight into work and set up camp and then set off on a very quiet evening bush stalk. We retired back to the camp for a back country and some cards to end the first day.

Day two
We dawned not particularly early but none the less we set off up a creek system opposite camp in hopes of reaching the tops to find a chamois or a roaring stag on the way. After traveling well up the creek and noticing things were starting to get a bit gorgey we made the executive descision to cut up through the bush to the leading ridge before we hit a water fall.

As none of us had hunted west of the divide we were in for a bit of a shock as we trudged our way up that face. We found the bush was thick and steep and that it is a lot further to the tops than it looks. After numerous checks of the gps to see how far we had gone and to make sure we were on the right path we finally made it to the tops at about 1pm. Hopes were immediately risen as there were chamois prints as fresh as this morning all around were we sat down. After about an hour of fruitless glassing lunch and photos of the unreal scenery we decided we better hit the track so we get back before it gets too dark.

On the way down we found the first real deer sign for the day. With a bit of roaring we couldn't find any owners of the sign and made our way down a large slip back to camp for another back country and some cards to finish the day.

Day three
We woke again not particularly early but hopes were high as based on some information where we were headed today was meant to be better for hunting. Our target to reach today was to make it to a tarn nestled in amongst the bush. We set off and were faced immediately with the task of crossing the Landsborough. Fortunately for us we had probably pulled a ballot for the best four days of weather that the coast had ever experienced so the water level was low and made the crossing of the river very easy.

After chucking back our dry boots on we climbed up into the bush audit came to our attention that this side of the valley was some what much more 'Deery'. Not that we would not what 'Deery' bush looks like because we don't usually venture far from the tussock for deer.

We stalked on quietly on high alert for the first 45min until the bush got a bit more nasty and had us slowed in pace and heightened in frustration quite rapidly. After sidling the face for quite a while we had the idea to climb up to the next terrace as soon as it was physically possible to get up as over the cliff. We found a spot that was about 30m high but had plent of trees and roots for the three of us to clamber up. When we made it to the top we quite relived and when we looked down we did question why in the hell we had done that.

Once we gathered our wits and checked the gps we decided to follow the nice terrace that we were on. After merely five meters I spotted a fairly well used game trial with a set of fresh prints on them. I exclaimed to the other " well if anybody knows a good route through this bloody bush it'll be the deer" so in that we started off. We may have been a bit out of a hunting mindset and more into a mind set of reaching our destination so we weren't as alert as we should have been. So after a small about of walking I heard some snapping of twigs. The three of us stopped dead in out tracks. The gun was readied as we crouched Down and strained our eyes to where the sound was coming for. The unmistakable smell of deer wafted into our noses. And we looked amongst each other excited how the tables had turned very quickly. Small moans and roar were let out along with a couple of hind and fawn calls thrown into the mix but we got no replies.  We crept along hearing twigs snap occasionally but we never caught a glimpse of that deer. But none the less with our lack of bush stalking skills we were still ecstatic the deer had even let us get that close. Which was a real highlight for our trip.

We stayed on high alert for the next couple of hundred meters but this diminished quickly as the bush reminded us who was boss and made the going difficult. At about 2:30pm without reaching the tarn three dejected hunters sat down and decided we better call it in and head back as the with the pace of progress we were making we weren't going to get back in time. So we decided to head off back down the hill To the river. We returned to camp to be attacked by the previously non-existent sandflies and settled into a one back country. (Which by now they were starting to lose there novelty) Over the game of cards that evening we talked about how we were disappointed in the fact that we had not heard a single roar.( Although we had drawn a fourth period ballot so we weren't expecting to hear much anyway) from this we decided that we would be better to pack up tomorrow morning a day early and take a lazy walk out. What had really taken us back was the fact that from a map or looking from the bottom the face looks nice and smooth and like realitively easy going. But underneath there is a jungle of thick bush. Moss growing over roots, giant rocks and bluffs, big holes and sharp ridges to name a few. This really had slowed our progress for the day and it wasn't something we were expecting.


Day 4
Another magic day greeted us as we crawled out of our tent and started to pack it all up. We again began the dreadfully boring slog down the river flats to the base of struts bluff where we were going to have a break to mentally prepare ourselves for it. On reaching the base we noticed that the river was down bloody low and we would have a good crack at crossing it on foot meaning we could skip the bluff. After crossing the river in two places and scampering up the bank to the truck we were delighted to have not had to walk up struts bluff saving us about 40mins.

Although nothing had been shot nore seen we were still very much satisfied with our trip. Having seen so much new country and trying something different was great. And getting close to that deer in the bush was a real highlight as it was our first attempt at bush hunting.

I would just quickly like to say thanks to Oscar and Clegg from on here who helped me out by giving me a bit of information on the block before we went in. Your information was extremely valuable and was very much appreciated by the three of us!

Base camp for our trip

The view from our glassing spot on our first days hunting

Myself with Mt. Hooker in the background

My mates crossing the landborough on our hunt on day two

A view from our glassing spot on our first day hunt with the landborough and Clarke river convergence in the background

The sun setting on our first evening in the valley

A photo whilst having lunch in the bush

Looking over to the Clarke mound from our glassing spot on the first day Hunt


Cheers High Country Boy
« Last Edit: Jun 10th, 2016 at 3:25am by High country boy »  
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #5 - Jun 9th, 2016 at 7:08am
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Nice one indeed  Smiley Its trophy country in there, deer or no deer
  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #6 - Jun 9th, 2016 at 7:03pm
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Looks like you has a great trip.
  
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #7 - Jun 9th, 2016 at 8:17pm
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Back to Basics
I have always been one to follow the latest trends. I bought my first rifle back in the 1980’s, a sporterised Swedish mauser in 6.5x55. I only managed to shoot one pig and lots of goats with it before I sold it and bought a Remington 700 in 30/06. A number of deer fell to the ‘06 and there was nothing wrong with it. It had blued steel and a walnut stock and never let me down. But like all young men I wanted bigger and better, synthetic stocks and stainless steel were the latest fashion accessories and I wanted them.

Eventually I bought another Remington, still in 30/06 but this one had a slim stainless steel barrel and synthetic stock. I still have it, but not much of it is left. It has a new barrel and is on its third stock, this one is carbon fibre. No need to get up close and see the whites of their eyes, deer out to 600 yards are as good as in the bag. Laser range finders, high powered scopes and ballistic apps on smart phones mean a shot this far away is a sure thing.

I’m now in my early 40’s and time for a mid-life crisis. I could get a mistress or convertible but instead I decided to look back, not forward, for once.
I shot my first deer in July 1987. It was on a Waikato NZDA organised hunt to Waihaha in Pureora. I was 16 and the ink on my firearms licence was only just dry. We walked in on a Friday night and I carried my father’s .303 jungle carbine. I had never fired it before but had been given the drill about how it worked. No telescopic sights adorned this beast, only aperture sights, the always up battle sight with the large aperture for the gloom of the jungle and the flip up aperture for the long shots.

The next morning I filled up the 10 shot mag with 20 year old CAC 180gr bullets, look out deer! I attached myself to Phil and his GSP Jacques. Phil had helped my friend shoot his first deer earlier in the year, so I figured Phil was the man to help me. He gave me some advice on how to hunt with my rifle safely, bolt pushed forward and safety on holding the bolt in place.

Amazingly, 6 hours later I had shot my first deer! Coming over a rise I had seen a yearling standing broadside on in the open bush, taking off the safety and closing the bolt I pointed the rifle in the general direction of the deer and yanked the trigger. Not surprisingly I missed! Luckily the deer only moved a step or two and quartered away from me. Taking a bit more time with the second shot I put the blade of the front sight behind the front leg and squeezed the trigger. This time the shot connected and the deer ran off.

Stopping where the deer had stood I asked Phil if we should look for blood, but Jacques was on the deer’s trail and within 40 metres he found it. I was hooked! I never hunted with Phil again and it took me 4 years to get my next deer.



There is something about blued steel, walnut and classic rifle design that captures your imagination. Hopefully by returning to some of the features of my first hunt I would recapture some of the exhilaration and excitement of 30 years ago.

Mauser, the name means a lot to firearms enthusiasts. To some Paul Mauser’s original design hasn’t been improved on. I don’t know if I buy in to that, but the name and especially Mauser Oberndorf mean big game hunting. I managed to track down a Mauser Oberndorf Type B in 9.3x62. This rifle was made in 1924 and had spent most of its time in Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe. The blueing is worn and the stock has marks all over it. Carrying this rifle you know you are holding history in your hands. It has shot most of the African game, probably buffalo and maybe elephant. One day I will take it back to Africa and reacquaint it with kudu, impala, wildebeest and hopefully a bushbuck.



The rifle is designed perfectly for open sights; it has a lot more drop at the heel compared to a modern rifle. Yours eyes naturally look right down the barrel and line up the sights. The wide V of the rear sight giving a wide field of view, perfect for elephant at 10 yards. The fore-end is slim and fits snugly in your hand. The sling swivel is on the barrel so that it does not contact your hand under recoil and so the rifle sits lower on the shoulder when being carried. This is not the sort of rifle that you shoot lying prone, off a bipod. At only 7.5 pounds, no recoil pad and firing a 286 grain projectile it certainly gets your attention when you pull the trigger.
The ammunition that came with the rifle was factory Norma 286gr soft point. This ammo doesn’t break any speed records, a leisurely 2200 fps, but a 286gr projectile at this velocity doesn’t take prisoners. Norma obviously prescribed to the momentum theory rather than explosive expansion. But then what would you want on a raking shot at a departing buffalo?

I’ve managed to replicate this load using ADI 2208 and 286gr prvi partisan projectiles. It is possible to get the 286gr going quite a bit faster using BLC2, but it shoots too high with the open sights.

I am going to have to dig out the old bush stalking skills and get personal with the animals again. I am sure they will show the whites of their eyes when they see the size of the hole down the barrel.

My first trip out with the 9.3 was to Kaikoura, not really bush stalking but I can’t shoot anything with it if I leave it in the gun cabinet. One billy goat paused and looked at us at 70 odd yards. A quick rest over the pack on a rock and a single shot through the shoulder had him tumbling down towards us. Not quite a cape buffalo, but I was on the board with the 9.3.



The next trip was 7 days in the Kaimanawas after sika. My bush stalking skills were put to the test, but no sika were sighted. One unfortunate possum fell to a 286gr handload.

I didn’t get the opportunity to go out much over the roar, one day trip got us close to some deer, but I didn’t get a look at them.
Then I had an overnight trip to an area I normally take my magnum , as shots are usually across gullies at 300yds. But I figured with the right opportunity and sticking close to the bush edge I might get a shot around 100yds.

The first night I saw 4 deer, 2stags and 2 hinds, but they were over a kilometre away so I just watched them. The next morning my plans to hunt the bush edge were scuppered due to a tail wind. I changed plans and headed out onto a spot that let me see down into several basins. My binoculars quickly found 2 stags about 700yds away feeding out in the open, trying to put on condition after the roar. I quickly moved about 100 yds down the hill towards them and stopped to check they were still there. I picked up one in the thick scrub heading back in to the bush and couldn’t see the other one.

I carried on glassing to see if anything else was out and quickly picked a third stag on the other side of the gully and only 300 yds away. If I could get down into the gully without being seen I might be able to close the gap. Staying crouched I hoped if he saw me he wouldn’t be too alarmed. But after 50 yds he saw me and quickly moved off. I followed him, hoping he might stop just over the ridge. Half way across the face I looked back down where the first two stags had been and saw a deer standing on the ridge. Putting the glasses on it I saw it was a hind, and then noticed one of the stags feeding in amongst the scrub.

I snuck back to the gully, trying not to roll too many rocks. I had lost sight of the stag but hadn’t seen him move off so I carried on. Part way down I took off my gaiters as they made a lot of noise if rubbed through a bush. Eventually I was down close to the stag, but the wind was switching and I wasn’t holding my breath on seeing him. I finally got to the ridge without seeing him, perhaps I should have brought my scoped Brno 7x57.

On the ridge I sat down and got the glasses out again, amazingly there was another stag in the next gully. He was the same height as me but about 250yds away. Keeping low I snuck through the scrub towards him. I had a place in mind where I could shoot from and was hoping he kept feeding. He looked up once and I froze, but soon he was feeding again. I carried on sneaking along and was about 5 yds from a small stump I could use as a rest when my pack scrapped against a bush. The stag immediately looked in my direction, bugger! I was crouched down partially obscured behind some bushes so figured if I waited long enough he would keep feeding. Where he was standing I could see his shoulder, neck and head. He kept staring trying to make out what I was.

Bugger it I‘m close enough. Sitting down I shuffled sideways and rested my elbows on knees and sighted on his shoulder. Front sight, front sight, front sight. Keeping the sight on the centre of his shoulder I squeezed off the shot. As the rifle recoiled I lost sight of the stag, but heard the satisfying slap of the bullet hitting the stag. Catching sight of the stag I saw him cart wheeling down through the scrub. I let out a loud woohoo! It had taken a little while, but I finally had shot a deer with my 9.3x62.

I made my way across to him and found he was a small 8 pointer, he was a bit skinny from the roar but should make some good sausages. I had subconsciously gone back to basics so much that I had left my phone with it's camera back at camp so couldn't get any photos of the stag, but the memory is burned in to my brain.
Putting the rifle back in the gun cabinet I look at my open sighted .404 jeffery, now I need to shoot a deer with that one.
  
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #8 - Jun 9th, 2016 at 9:26pm
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Seeing as i bought up there being no roar comp this year id better enter one.

Heres a link a write up about the best weekend on my 2016 roar, finally getting a good Fallow on the deck

http://www.fishnhunt.co.nz/forum/YaBB.cgi?num=1464705473/0

Cheers all

Mike
  
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #9 - Jun 10th, 2016 at 1:22am
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Thanks guys..happy we got a good response.
  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #10 - Jun 10th, 2016 at 7:15am
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Wicked report chaps. Great photos hcb. Who shoots a possum with a 286 grain bullet stug? Good on you for looking back.
  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #11 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 1:17am
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Top reports, cheers for sharing. Top work on the prizes and such too  Cool
  

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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #12 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 3:52am
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Are we allowed to put more than 1 trip in?
  
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #13 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 5:38am
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My oath, makes up for the lazy or work-constrained hunters that never went out for a shot.  Smiley
  

Get as close as you can, then get a bit closer.
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Re: A no Roar Story 2016 Roar Competition.
Reply #14 - Jun 11th, 2016 at 7:10am
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RuahineRowan wrote on Jun 11th, 2016 at 3:52am:
Are we allowed to put more than 1 trip in?


Sure  Smiley
  

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