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Errol Clince
Sep 14th, 2014 at 3:15am
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Errol Clince died on the 8th of September after a short battle with cancer.
His passing was marked by a service on friday which was attended by an enormous number of friends. He was delivered to the cemetary in style in a heavy lift by the local flyboy.
Some of you will remember Errol as a very effective goat culler back in the Forest Service days. And every one seems to have a story to tell about him.
The owner of the Waitotara Forests website is a close friend of Errol and will dedicate a section of the site to him when things settle. Keep an eye out for it and take the chance to contribute. I am sure there are a few photos out there.
Rest in peace Errol
Baz


  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #1 - Sep 14th, 2014 at 3:38am
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Bugga
Errol started shooting on Egmont for me in about 1970, I think.
Was a bit of a dagg, bloody keen hunter and hard worker.
RIP Errol
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #2 - Sep 14th, 2014 at 6:45am
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Another good keen man passed on. RIP
  

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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #3 - Sep 14th, 2014 at 8:17am
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When I joined the NZFS I was dropped off at road end and told to walk in to Puteora. It was arranged that Errol would meet me somewhere on the way. Well I was bowling along the track at a good pace  with the rain persisting down when I noticed a piece of black poly on the ground in front of me. It seemed to be covering something. That thing was Errol who was having a snooze under the cover of the poly.
Errol was an excellent hut mate and I often think of those days spent chasing smellies. RIP Errol.
  

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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #4 - Sep 14th, 2014 at 9:54am
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RIP.

From memory one of Errols more interesting 'finds' was the remains of a WWII military aircraft in the Pouakai Range in early 1974 at a guess. Still had the crews remains in it.
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #5 - Sep 14th, 2014 at 10:56am
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The herald had an article about it just in the last few days.
I am too much of a newbie to be allowed to create a link.
If someone could be so good as to google it and link it here.(Search Errol Clince)
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #6 - Sep 14th, 2014 at 7:59pm
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Only found this from Pukariki museum site about crashes on Egmont

Quote:
Airspeed Oxford 23 October 1942
Errol Clince's diary for Tuesday 15 January 1974 reads:
‘Hunted Mangorei Stream got 10 goats found old bomber below Mangorei hut somewhere. There were a lot of empty 303 bullet shells. There was a machine gun there and an old parachute still not undone it was very rotten. I also found the leg bone of a human. I then buggered off from there fast!’

The 20-year-old Forest Service hunter had been shooting goats in the area for a week and was unaware an Airspeed Oxford trainer had gone missing on Alamein Day 32 years earlier.

He vividly recalls the day he came across the plane in 1974.

"I was walking along up this creek just mucking around," he said.  "There was a water fall and I came back from it, went left a bit and up a bank and saw the turret with the machine gun in it. I couldn't make out any of the fuselage, I think there was a bit of a wing up in a tree. It had ploughed into a tree which had fallen over it and it was covered in ferns."
 
Pure luck had brought the forest worker to the aeroplane's gravesite.

"I mucked about with it and pulled the machine gun out. I was going to take it home because it looked the part - the first Rambo. I was most fascinated with the sights, everything was intact although it was pretty rusty."

He changed his mind and left the gun beside the plane - where it later bamboozled air accident inspectors - as it should have been in the plane.

Looking back Errol says he's ashamed he didn't show more respect to the aircraft and its crew.

"The worst thing about it was I ruined a lot of it because I didn't know it hadn't been found. I was a bit like a magpie. Anything there that was shiny I touched. I pulled out a parachute and opened it up. I found the controls and started playing with them."

With a wry grin he recalls the air force accident inspector Wing Commander Chippendale later looking at the same controls.

"He was saying 'Well they're in this position so the pilot must have been doing that...' I had to look away... I'd put them wrong."

He then found a shiny white object and pulled it out for a better look.

"It was obvious it was a human leg bone.  I put it down very quickly!"

Errol later took local search and rescue man Dave Rawson up to see the plane, followed by the police, RNZAF personnel, search and rescue crew and the media. He featured in the newspaper and was a minor celebrity for a while.

The plane was identified as an Oxford that had been on a training run from New Plymouth on 23 October 1942, shooting at a towed aerial target over the sea when it got lost in heavy cloud. Aerial and ground teams had searched for the plane for three months before giving up.
 
Errol helped collect the remains of the airmen: Pilot Officer Rodney Dandy and crew Sgt Douglas Martyn, Sgt Graham Martin and Sgt Edward Dodson who were identified from their position in the wreckage, and by initials on rings, silver plated propelling pencils and other personal belongings.

"I remember we put them in sacks and carried them out." The recovery allowed the men's families to hold funerals and say goodbye to their loved ones. "One of the men's wives came to see me a few months later to say thank-you."

Errol worked for the Forest Service for 16 years, getting to know the mountain as well as his back yard. Over the years he came across the sites of the other plane crashes on the mountain - the Gypsy Moth, the Avro Anson and the Ventura Bomber.

He hasn't been back to the site of the Oxford crash for 25 years, but it's a find he'll never forget


  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #7 - Sep 15th, 2014 at 7:02am
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I met Errol earlier this year at the stratford mountain house, bit of a character alright.
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #8 - Sep 18th, 2014 at 6:32pm
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I hunted with Errol during the 70s. We were both employed by the NZFS. We spent a lot of time together in the huts throughout the Matemateongas, Waitotara State Forest and competed with each other for numbers on Mt Egmont in the goat culling days. He was a great mate. Errol had a great send off and packed out the Baptist church in Stratford. He was a bit of a dry ball though and used to make us laugh with his weird sense of humor and his then outlook on life. RIP mate.
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #9 - Sep 19th, 2014 at 9:12am
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Bing wrote on Sep 18th, 2014 at 6:32pm:
I hunted with Errol during the 70s. We were both employed by the NZFS. We spent a lot of time together in the huts throughout the Matemateongas, Waitotara State Forest and competed with each other for numbers on Mt Egmont in the goat culling days. He was a great mate. Errol had a great send off and packed out the Baptist church in Stratford. He was a bit of a dry ball though and used to make us laugh with his weird sense of humor and his then outlook on life. RIP mate.

I gather he holds the all time record for goats culled from Egmont.  7000 culls I think.
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #10 - Sep 21st, 2014 at 6:41am
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Tararua Hunter wrote on Sep 14th, 2014 at 7:59pm:
Only found this from Pukariki museum site about crashes on Egmont

Quote:
Airspeed Oxford 23 October 1942
Errol Clince's diary for Tuesday 15 January 1974 reads:
‘Hunted Mangorei Stream got 10 goats found old bomber below Mangorei hut somewhere. There were a lot of empty 303 bullet shells. There was a machine gun there and an old parachute still not undone it was very rotten. I also found the leg bone of a human. I then buggered off from there fast!’

The 20-year-old Forest Service hunter had been shooting goats in the area for a week and was unaware an Airspeed Oxford trainer had gone missing on Alamein Day 32 years earlier.

He vividly recalls the day he came across the plane in 1974.

"I was walking along up this creek just mucking around," he said.  "There was a water fall and I came back from it, went left a bit and up a bank and saw the turret with the machine gun in it. I couldn't make out any of the fuselage, I think there was a bit of a wing up in a tree. It had ploughed into a tree which had fallen over it and it was covered in ferns."
 
Pure luck had brought the forest worker to the aeroplane's gravesite.

"I mucked about with it and pulled the machine gun out. I was going to take it home because it looked the part - the first Rambo. I was most fascinated with the sights, everything was intact although it was pretty rusty."

He changed his mind and left the gun beside the plane - where it later bamboozled air accident inspectors - as it should have been in the plane.

Looking back Errol says he's ashamed he didn't show more respect to the aircraft and its crew.

"The worst thing about it was I ruined a lot of it because I didn't know it hadn't been found. I was a bit like a magpie. Anything there that was shiny I touched. I pulled out a parachute and opened it up. I found the controls and started playing with them."

With a wry grin he recalls the air force accident inspector Wing Commander Chippendale later looking at the same controls.

"He was saying 'Well they're in this position so the pilot must have been doing that...' I had to look away... I'd put them wrong."

He then found a shiny white object and pulled it out for a better look.

"It was obvious it was a human leg bone.  I put it down very quickly!"

Errol later took local search and rescue man Dave Rawson up to see the plane, followed by the police, RNZAF personnel, search and rescue crew and the media. He featured in the newspaper and was a minor celebrity for a while.

The plane was identified as an Oxford that had been on a training run from New Plymouth on 23 October 1942, shooting at a towed aerial target over the sea when it got lost in heavy cloud. Aerial and ground teams had searched for the plane for three months before giving up.
 
Errol helped collect the remains of the airmen: Pilot Officer Rodney Dandy and crew Sgt Douglas Martyn, Sgt Graham Martin and Sgt Edward Dodson who were identified from their position in the wreckage, and by initials on rings, silver plated propelling pencils and other personal belongings.

"I remember we put them in sacks and carried them out." The recovery allowed the men's families to hold funerals and say goodbye to their loved ones. "One of the men's wives came to see me a few months later to say thank-you."

Errol worked for the Forest Service for 16 years, getting to know the mountain as well as his back yard. Over the years he came across the sites of the other plane crashes on the mountain - the Gypsy Moth, the Avro Anson and the Ventura Bomber.

He hasn't been back to the site of the Oxford crash for 25 years, but it's a find he'll never forget




TH, from what Errol told me, he was mooching along towards the park boundary with his trusty binoculars where there is a nearby nudist colony. As I was a naive 16 year old I wasn't sure what he meant. Any truth in that?
  

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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #11 - Sep 21st, 2014 at 7:32am
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TH, from what Errol told me, he was mooching along towards the park boundary with his trusty binoculars where there is a nearby nudist colony. As I was a naive 16 year old I wasn't sure what he meant. Any truth in that?

Think that was near mangorie road end somewhere. I never checked it out Roll Eyes
Perhaps Errol did
quite a few life style places up there now and a lot of Egmont style boardwalk/corduroy on the track now to
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #12 - Sep 14th, 2018 at 7:27am
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Went for a walk in the weekend with the boy and my wife, had directions and found the plane wreck. Quite a nostalgic feel about it.

                                                            

Also went to the waterfall, which I had heard was just little.
I for one thought she was quite decent  and definitely a nice fall of water.

                                                            

The rest of this post is copied and pasted from the Puke Airiki (Taranaki Museum) website.

Airspeed Oxford 23 October 1942
Errol Clince's diary for Tuesday 15 January 1974 reads:
‘Hunted Mangorei Stream got 10 goats found old bomber below Mangorei hut somewhere. There were a lot of empty 303 bullet shells. There was a machine gun there and an old parachute still not undone it was very rotten. I also found the leg bone of a human. I then buggered off from there fast!’

The 20-year-old Forest Service hunter had been shooting goats in the area for a week and was unaware an Airspeed Oxford trainer had gone missing on Alamein Day 32 years earlier.

He vividly recalls the day he came across the plane in 1974.

"I was walking along up this creek just mucking around," he said.  "There was a water fall and I came back from it, went left a bit and up a bank and saw the turret with the machine gun in it. I couldn't make out any of the fuselage, I think there was a bit of a wing up in a tree. It had ploughed into a tree which had fallen over it and it was covered in ferns."
 
Pure luck had brought the forest worker to the aeroplane's gravesite.

"I mucked about with it and pulled the machine gun out. I was going to take it home because it looked the part - the first Rambo. I was most fascinated with the sights, everything was intact although it was pretty rusty."

He changed his mind and left the gun beside the plane - where it later bamboozled air accident inspectors - as it should have been in the plane.

Looking back Errol says he's ashamed he didn't show more respect to the aircraft and its crew.

"The worst thing about it was I ruined a lot of it because I didn't know it hadn't been found. I was a bit like a magpie. Anything there that was shiny I touched. I pulled out a parachute and opened it up. I found the controls and started playing with them."

With a wry grin he recalls the air force accident inspector Wing Commander Chippendale later looking at the same controls.

"He was saying 'Well they're in this position so the pilot must have been doing that...' I had to look away... I'd put them wrong."

He then found a shiny white object and pulled it out for a better look.

"It was obvious it was a human leg bone.  I put it down very quickly!"

Errol later took local search and rescue man Dave Rawson up to see the plane, followed by the police, RNZAF personnel, search and rescue crew and the media. He featured in the newspaper and was a minor celebrity for a while.

The plane was identified as an Oxford that had been on a training run from New Plymouth on 23 October 1942, shooting at a towed aerial target over the sea when it got lost in heavy cloud. Aerial and ground teams had searched for the plane for three months before giving up.
 
Errol helped collect the remains of the airmen: Pilot Officer Rodney Dandy and crew Sgt Douglas Martyn, Sgt Graham Martin and Sgt Edward Dodson who were identified from their position in the wreckage, and by initials on rings, silver plated propelling pencils and other personal belongings.

"I remember we put them in sacks and carried them out." The recovery allowed the men's families to hold funerals and say goodbye to their loved ones. "One of the men's wives came to see me a few months later to say thank-you."

Errol worked for the Forest Service for 16 years, getting to know the mountain as well as his back yard. Over the years he came across the sites of the other plane crashes on the mountain - the Gypsy Moth, the Avro Anson and the Ventura Bomber.

He hasn't been back to the site of the Oxford crash for 25 years, but it's a find he'll never forget.
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #13 - Sep 18th, 2018 at 2:38pm
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its a wondr it never got found earlier. there were NZFS hunters crawling all over the mountain.
Used to deal with Dave Rawson a lot. He cut a fewtracks for us, for goat hunting. On the pouakais and around stratford side
  
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Re: Errol Clince
Reply #14 - Sep 18th, 2018 at 9:10pm
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Tararua Hunter wrote on Sep 18th, 2018 at 2:38pm:
its a wondr it never got found earlier. there were NZFS hunters crawling all over the mountain.
Used to deal with Dave Rawson a lot. He cut a fewtracks for us, for goat hunting. On the pouakais and around stratford side


From memory they cut some low level tracks,and built a few temporary huts simply for the hunting, TH? I recall one that went east off the Dawson falls road in the general direction of the Stratford Rd?
  
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