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Normal Topic The Hunters' Silence (Read 5042 times)
Victor
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The Hunters' Silence
Jan 25th, 2013 at 4:14am
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Thought I'd try my hand at some writing. Criticism welcomed.

>>

“There’s a few poking around,” he murmured. “Good spot for the roar.”

Blimmin useful information, I thought. I opted for a less direct method, nodding towards of a mounted set of antlers. “Is that twelve pointer from around here? It’s a beaut!”

“Yeap. Got that one a few years back now.”

“Did you need to walk far into the bush to find him?” I probed further.

“Oh, I can’t remember exactly where I got it. Just look for the broadleaf, you’ll be right,” came the reply. Simple. Just look for the broadleaf trees and the deer will obligingly jump in front of your stray bullets. “That’s about all I can tell you, fella. Yeah, sorry about that,” the old hunter quite thoroughly explained.

That was when I was a spring chicken. I was naive and I’d wrongly assumed he’d tell me where to find his quarry, his spiritual ground and his food source. I’ve learnt a lot since then. I’m not claiming to know a heck of a lot more about hunting now than I did that day, but I know a shedload more about hard work.

I grew up in town. We lived in a three bedroom home just ten minutes’ walk to the CBD. After school I’d head to the river, push myself around on a skateboard and play Crash Bandicoot on the PlayStation. My old man didn’t hunt and I was only interested in the outdoors as much as the next city slicker. I’d first learnt stock from barrel when I was eighteen years old. That was when my dad decided to up and leave town for a modest block of land in the Nelson Lakes area. I shot rabbits with my grandfather’s Remington .22, and loved it! All unbridled addictions start small.

I soon grew thirsty for a real challenge. I tagged along on a pig hunt, and travelled to Kurow for some wallabies. I was lucky to have a couple of good buggers around me who could show me the ropes. But I knew what I really wanted – my first deer!

It was a year and a half before I got that deer. Eighteen months of bashing through scrub, walking up beech ridges, prying information from tight-lipped hunter bastards. Most of them said the same thing. I learnt how to read between the lines, and how to ask the right questions. I learnt that doing a bit of research before asking shows that you’re keen to do the work required, and it goes a long way. I learnt the hard and slow way, but I was rewarded eventually with a tasty fallow pricket. It was mine, right from the planning, through the stalk and back to the table.

I’ve always told myself that I was not to be one of those cagey hunter bastards, that I’d help the young and keen and point them in the right direction for a good chance at game. I’m still relatively fresh and I remember exactly what it was like. It’s tough coming from a non-hunting background – who do you talk to, and what do you ask? Are you walking too fast or too slow, and do you have the right gear? Most of all, are you ever going to see deer in the spot you hunt?

So recently when a young fella approached me asking for a bit of hunting advice, I knew exactly what to say.

“Just look for the broadleaf.”
  
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #1 - Jan 25th, 2013 at 8:55am
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Cool exactly as it should be. enjoyed that.
  
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #2 - Jan 26th, 2013 at 8:26pm
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Haa haaa..ya bastard!! GrinExcellant post..cheers! Cool
  
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #3 - Jan 27th, 2013 at 7:49am
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Hah, nice one, written well mate
  

Make it happen!
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #4 - Jan 27th, 2013 at 5:13pm
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enjoyed that
cheers
  
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #5 - Jan 30th, 2013 at 4:28am
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Nice read,
cheers
Smiley
  
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #6 - Jan 30th, 2013 at 8:18am
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keep right on writing
Grin Grin Grin
  

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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #7 - May 15th, 2013 at 8:17pm
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Entertaining read Victor.
Nicely done--Keep it up.
Cheers.
  

Too Old To Die Young.
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #8 - May 15th, 2013 at 10:15pm
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Very good Victor,enjoyed that  Cool
  

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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #9 - May 15th, 2013 at 10:50pm
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Cool
  

It's ok if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right.
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #10 - May 15th, 2013 at 11:07pm
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Good read Victor.

The first deer is always the hardest!  It get's easier after you've nailed the first.  Bit like fishing.  When I was young I saved my money and bought a new rod.  Took me ages to catch the first fish with it, but after that they came thick and fast..!!
  
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #11 - May 22nd, 2013 at 8:23am
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I like your style Victor. Nice one.
And yes, there's often very strong reasons for a hunter to stay silent.
  

The fraternity of shooters is rather like the fraternity of blind men -- each one walks alone.&&: Ian Niall.
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #12 - May 22nd, 2013 at 9:03am
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Good little tip  there Victor, that you passed on.  Smiley At least you never told him " look where the spring grass is growing, at 2am, on a windless morning.... with a good spotlight."  Cheesy Grin
  

Get as close as you can, then get a bit closer.
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Re: The Hunters' Silence
Reply #13 - May 27th, 2013 at 3:49am
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Victor wrote on Jan 25th, 2013 at 4:14am:
Thought I'd try my hand at some writing. Criticism welcomed.

>>

“There’s a few poking around,” he murmured. “Good spot for the roar.”

Blimmin useful information, I thought. I opted for a less direct method, nodding towards of a mounted set of antlers. “Is that twelve pointer from around here? It’s a beaut!”

“Yeap. Got that one a few years back now.”

“Did you need to walk far into the bush to find him?” I probed further.

“Oh, I can’t remember exactly where I got it. Just look for the broadleaf, you’ll be right,” came the reply. Simple. Just look for the broadleaf trees and the deer will obligingly jump in front of your stray bullets. “That’s about all I can tell you, fella. Yeah, sorry about that,” the old hunter quite thoroughly explained.

That was when I was a spring chicken. I was naive and I’d wrongly assumed he’d tell me where to find his quarry, his spiritual ground and his food source. I’ve learnt a lot since then. I’m not claiming to know a heck of a lot more about hunting now than I did that day, but I know a shedload more about hard work.

I grew up in town. We lived in a three bedroom home just ten minutes’ walk to the CBD. After school I’d head to the river, push myself around on a skateboard and play Crash Bandicoot on the PlayStation. My old man didn’t hunt and I was only interested in the outdoors as much as the next city slicker. I’d first learnt stock from barrel when I was eighteen years old. That was when my dad decided to up and leave town for a modest block of land in the Nelson Lakes area. I shot rabbits with my grandfather’s Remington .22, and loved it! All unbridled addictions start small.

I soon grew thirsty for a real challenge. I tagged along on a pig hunt, and travelled to Kurow for some wallabies. I was lucky to have a couple of good buggers around me who could show me the ropes. But I knew what I really wanted – my first deer!

It was a year and a half before I got that deer. Eighteen months of bashing through scrub, walking up beech ridges, prying information from tight-lipped hunter bastards. Most of them said the same thing. I learnt how to read between the lines, and how to ask the right questions. I learnt that doing a bit of research before asking shows that you’re keen to do the work required, and it goes a long way. I learnt the hard and slow way, but I was rewarded eventually with a tasty fallow pricket. It was mine, right from the planning, through the stalk and back to the table.

I’ve always told myself that I was not to be one of those cagey hunter bastards, that I’d help the young and keen and point them in the right direction for a good chance at game. I’m still relatively fresh and I remember exactly what it was like. It’s tough coming from a non-hunting background – who do you talk to, and what do you ask? Are you walking too fast or too slow, and do you have the right gear? Most of all, are you ever going to see deer in the spot you hunt?

So recently when a young fella approached me asking for a bit of hunting advice, I knew exactly what to say.

“Just look for the broadleaf.”


Cool
  
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