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Hot Topic (More than 30 Replies) First Aid Kit (Read 23820 times)
ethos
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First Aid Kit
May 11th, 2012 at 8:50am
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Here is a breakdown on the contents of a pig hunters dog first aid kit.


Carry bag, pretty self explanatory.


Scalpel blades or you can use razor blades, handy for trimming bits of tissue hanging by a thread, also good for shaving wound edges prior to closure after wetting hair.


Isotonic saline. The best type of liqiuid for cleaning muddy and dirty wounds, also good for flushing eyes when sterile. This is a flexipac, to use in the field snip a corner off with scissors and tip out.
The odd pig hunter in the tropics knows how to rig these intravenously to treat for heat exhaustion but that takes training and a bit more gear.


Wound dressing, good to apply after cleaning the wound, helps to soak up and "wick away" ooze from an open wound, put over exposed tissue prior to applying a bandage.


Swabs - similar to wound dressings, good to pack in to open wounds to apply pressure before bandaging. Best not to pack in to an opened abdominal cavity if you can help it as they will be hard to find later.


Wound powder. Hated by vets as its messy as all hell but can help to reduce infection in an open wound, puff away! Iodine solution is harder to carry but a very good alternative (diluted 50/50 or even 1/10).


Clamps/haemostats. Clip on to large arteries. Head for the vet.


"Vetrap" or cohesive bandage. Sticks to itself but not to hair, loses stick with blood, very flexible. A great bandage to apply pressure, breathable.


Elastoplast bandage. Sticks to hair, slightly flexible, slightly breathable. A good bandage layer for anchoring a bandage in place and less easy for a dog to get teeth in to. Be careful of getting too tight if leaving on more than a few hours.


Stapler. Pull edges of skin together and staple every 0.5 to 1 cm. Good for closing long rips, if closing over dirty tissue (not recommended)or an open pocket, its advisable to still get it tidied by the vet who can clean it/place drains under anaesthetic. Shaving the hair on wound edges can give a cleaner and quicker healing time - dont leave hair under the skin.



Staple remover. Remove staples 14 days later, "crimp" staples in the middle and they should be removed pain free.


Scissors for trimming bandages, opening fluid bag, if boiled and sterile can be used to trim a wound.

Happy hunting.




  
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Fly-My-Pretties
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #1 - May 13th, 2012 at 7:00am
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Great info, where did you get most of your kit and also the saline solution?
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #2 - May 13th, 2012 at 12:03pm
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I get to cheat and buy it through work (vet). Ive put this kit together so its fairly similar to those on the market though.
  
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jerry
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #3 - May 13th, 2012 at 8:58pm
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Can you supply those kits locally? Almost lost a dog in the weekend and reminds me that my kit is getting a bit low, that looks really comprehensive
  
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Aunty
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #4 - May 13th, 2012 at 11:51pm
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Ethos the wound powder - I was forced to use a vet that was not my regular vet last year for a good rip that my dog got. I had puffed it with wound powder. Now admittedly this vet is known locally as a real homo, and his reaction shouldn't have surprised me but it did - basically he claimed the wound powder was crap for 'messing up a nice clean wound' - your thoughts please.
  

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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #5 - May 14th, 2012 at 12:23am
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Hi Jerry, I havnt got the final cost for this kit (was put together as an example rather than for retail), because its vet gear it will work out more expensive than something like this:
http://www.torpedo7.co.nz/products/RYH1AN2EK/title/ridgeline-pig-dog-emergency-s... which has the basics and could be added on to.

Aunty, yes vets loathe the wound powder- if a dog is coming straight in for stitching dont use it, but if you are a day or more away from civilisation and you want to reduce infection in a less serious wound, then it has its place.
  
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jerry
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #6 - May 14th, 2012 at 1:24am
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Good link, I will grab one of those kits to add to what I have now.

Cheers
  
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optio
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #7 - May 14th, 2012 at 4:43am
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Great post, very useful and comprehensive Smiley Just one point I would like to clarify -  when using vetrap/coban whatever - it has many names depending on the producer, just watch when applying that it isn't too tight when not being used for pressure (and that it is checked once wound clotted/stiched if it has been used for pressure). It is very stretchy and in the haste to create a good firm bandage sometimes it can become too tight and seriously affect circulation.
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #8 - May 14th, 2012 at 9:00am
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Hi Ethos, one product that i used to use was EMT gel, however no longer available in NZ. Do you know of a similar product? http://emtgel.com/
Cheers Martin
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #9 - May 14th, 2012 at 9:21am
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Quote:

I reckon that kit is a bit over priced, but good size to carry and includes most of the basics, however i spend fifty bucks down the safety shop and brought a good 1st aid kit with twice as much stuff and only very slightly bigger.....i also added stapler and a few odds bits the vet gave me. Its sometimes not only the dogs that need a staple or 2
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #10 - May 14th, 2012 at 11:40am
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Can you put some photos up stevebro ?
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #11 - May 15th, 2012 at 5:00am
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Drahthaar wrote on May 14th, 2012 at 9:00am:
Hi Ethos, one product that i used to use was EMT gel, however no longer available in NZ. Do you know of a similar product? http://emtgel.com/
Cheers Martin

Yep, that is great stuff... I still ahve a tube here.

BTW Ethos, I have used Manuka honey on wounds... is that an old wives tale or is it a good natural remedy??? It seems to have done the job for me, but am interested in a pros opinion.
  

I'm sorry if I offended you when I called you stupid! I honestly thought you already knew!
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #12 - May 15th, 2012 at 6:25am
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I think the consensus is that makuka honey does have some mild antibacterial properties- I know of several dog and horse owners who use it and swear by it.
  
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stevebro
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #13 - May 15th, 2012 at 7:18am
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...haha he looks smaller than he is, 128lb. I stuck myself in the leg wrestling with him....lesson learnt!! but still carried him out by myself.
Now i have one of these in the truck and just carry bare essentials on me.
Follow link thru to 1st aid kits and i got the  premium vehicle kit for $54.   
http://www.nzsafety.co.nz/servlet/Srv.Ecos_Signon?CN=15366&AC=185E7D4D361E7D4D&U...
I added stapler and remover, electrical tape, superglue (for those hard to staple areas), antibiotics and a small bottle of iodine.....i think i got a tube of drycow antibiotic cream or simalar. I will add some internal stitching gear on fly in trips.
  
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optio
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #14 - May 15th, 2012 at 8:28am
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An alternative to manuka honey is a good high concentrate tea tree oil, the active properties in the oil are far more concentrated than the honey. However not all manuka honeys or tea tree oil are created equal - some have a higher medicinal rate than others.
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #15 - May 15th, 2012 at 8:33am
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I heard that apparently only the manuka honey from reputable health organisations works, that from the farm doesn't, haha wonkers

Ethos, as mentioned with the wound powder, can one use dry cow, i have had it from one vet yet other vet says no don't use it,wrong type of peni

Also is there any sort of antibiotic that will stay in suspension in a syringe so you could carry that in a kit for when your 24hrs or so from the vet

And lastly... guys do your mutts chew out the staples you put in them, mine do with stitches and make a far worse mess,apart from a bucket on the head i ask the vet not to stitch them if possible and 9 times outa 10 he wont
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #16 - May 15th, 2012 at 9:04am
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optio wrote on May 15th, 2012 at 8:28am:
An alternative to manuka honey is a good high concentrate tea tree oil, the active properties in the oil are far more concentrated than the honey. However not all manuka honeys or tea tree oil are created equal - some have a higher medicinal rate than others.

Also true although Ive seen one dog develop a nasty skin reaction to tea tree oil so Id suggest only trying it fairly well diluted.
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #17 - May 15th, 2012 at 9:09am
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moonhunt wrote on May 15th, 2012 at 8:33am:
I heard that apparently only the manuka honey from reputable health organisations works, that from the farm doesn't, haha wonkers

Ethos, as mentioned with the wound powder, can one use dry cow, i have had it from one vet yet other vet says no don't use it,wrong type of peni

Also is there any sort of antibiotic that will stay in suspension in a syringe so you could carry that in a kit for when your 24hrs or so from the vet

And lastly... guys do your mutts chew out the staples you put in them, mine do with stitches and make a far worse mess,apart from a bucket on the head i ask the vet not to stitch them if possible and 9 times outa 10 he wont


If your mate works on a dairy farm then teat spray disinfectants are also very handy. Both the iodine spray and the chlorhexidine used for teat washes are very good topical disinfectants to carry in a kit- dilute it down to use 1/10 or even more. Dont get chlorhexidine in eyes. Less messy than wound powder and better for killing bugs.

Most penicillins and derivatives will settle out in syringe so bottles are better to take (after appropriate presciption ). Penicillin doesnt like too much heat so its not ideal to be bouncing around in the car.
  
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Drahthaar
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #18 - May 15th, 2012 at 9:12am
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Keep chlorhexidine out of light it will break it down.
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #19 - May 15th, 2012 at 9:15am
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stevebro wrote on May 15th, 2012 at 7:18am:


...haha he looks smaller than he is, 128lb. I stuck myself in the leg wrestling with him....lesson learnt!! but still carried him out by myself.
Now i have one of these in the truck and just carry bare essentials on me.
Follow link thru to 1st aid kits and i got the  premium vehicle kit for $54.   
http://www.nzsafety.co.nz/servlet/Srv.Ecos_Signon?CN=15366&AC=185E7D4D361E7D4D&U...
I added stapler and remover, electrical tape, superglue (for those hard to staple areas), antibiotics and a small bottle of iodine.....i think i got a tube of drycow antibiotic cream or simalar. I will add some internal stitching gear on fly in trips.

Thats a decent set up. Brownie points for the iodine.
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #20 - May 15th, 2012 at 10:29am
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Check out this product guys. Im sure you can think of its applications for pig hunters, not just for your hounds but you or your mates in the event of any life threatening injuries.

They just released another version of the same product in a syringe, which is perfect if you've got any deep gushing pokes. You simply jab it i and squeeze away, once the contents of the syringe is out apply pressure the same as in the video.

Check out the vid in the link below when it loads.

http://www.celox.co.nz/page688166.html

Edit: and the syringe in action...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YM_S6o9mUBc
  
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optio
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #21 - May 15th, 2012 at 11:33pm
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Looks and sounds like a great product Dublin! I would still however be a little cautious when using on someone who is on anticoagulants - although it claims to be entirely safe. Is it a brand new product - I have never seen or heard of it before?
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #22 - May 16th, 2012 at 3:38am
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Shouldnt need to use chlorhex in the field. If well irrigated you should be able to close the wound without creating an abcess. The wound is already dirty and you wont get it clean..
Dont close puncture wounds as you will create an abcess..
I work in emergency and study wilderness medicine..
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #23 - May 16th, 2012 at 8:01am
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Youve got some good points there:

Leaving simple poke holes open is usually a good idea to allow drainage -  obvious exceptions are if the hole communicates with the chest or abdomen.

If its truly dirty you will struggle to get it clean and it is not advised to close a dirty wound.

I differ on the using chlorhex or other antispetics in the field. Most pig dog wounds are not brought in to the vet clinic within the golden hour.
The wounds are made by the mouthparts of an animal that eats carrion - they have a high bacterial load.
Saline irrigation is always good but with materials available not always enough to reduce contamination in extensive wounds. Antiseptics have their place for wounds that must wait some hours to close.

Most pig dog wounds closed in clinic will be surgically debrided, drains are often placed as well.
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #24 - May 17th, 2012 at 1:50am
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Id just add that antiseptics are also good for small wounds that arent stitched.
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #25 - May 17th, 2012 at 5:36am
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question for you Ethos... you commented that pig dog wounds gernally get to the clinic inn the "golden Hr" can you explain this a bit more please... I have had pigdogs ripped while away in the bush for several days and when back, go straight to the vets only for them to say I was too late for them to stitch it up... yet when I needed to get my working dog stitched up on a saturday morning (cow stood on her foot exposing bone on one of the digits from knuckle to knuckle) I was told to dress it and come in on the monday... Shocked

I am not asking this as a grumble about Vets rather so I know what time frame I should be working within or is acceptable to stitch up wounds.

PS... dont laugh but 1 item I put into my first aid kit is Tampons... great for bad bleeders and punture wounds...
  
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ethos
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #26 - May 17th, 2012 at 6:45am
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"The golden hour" is a medical term used to describe the timeframe which gives best results when dealing with a trauma.
The take home message is the chances of good wound closure are best early on.
Over time there is tissue die back on the wound edges from being exposed to air, and also multiplication of bacteria. The cleanest, freshest wound edges will heal the best.

In fact how quickly a wound deteriorates depends not just on time but on a number of other factors including- temperature, damage to blood vessels, amount of contamination and so on.
A fair number of pig dogs are brought in the following day and normally they heal well after surgical debriding (trimming the edges).
As you have observed, a less contaminated wound may wait 24 hrs plus in the right conditions, if in doubt ring the vet let them make the call- its their head on the block!
Its no cause to panic about instant stitching (unless the dog is losing blood, very extensive injuries, has difficulty breathing or an opened abdomen) but its good to get done as soon as practically possible.

Yes tampons or sanitary pads are a good addition to the first aid kit just as you say.
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #27 - May 17th, 2012 at 8:18am
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cheers for that Ethos... 12 yrs of dairy farming and pighunting provide plenty of opportunity to learn if your keen... I am always quick to the vets with injured dogs if required but very good to hear a "unit standard." makes it much easier to make decisions at the right time... end of it... my mutts do their jobs so I am happy to do mine... and always keen to learn more
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #28 - Sep 9th, 2014 at 9:02am
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Great info, thanks so much
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #29 - Nov 14th, 2014 at 8:00am
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If you can bull shit a vet i get a blue spray on topical antibiotic just for basic slice's pads, legs and stuff never had a major gusher to repair on the hill. But i carry pritty much the same kit including a tampon for that one time you might get a nasty poke.
  
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Re: First Aid Kit
Reply #30 - Feb 15th, 2015 at 3:28pm
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Ethos,

First of all may I commend you on a great post and the response it has had from others.

I completely agree with you 100% on the stuff that you carry.

Even though we don't encounter any pigs over here in the UK, our coursing dogs often run into a barbed wire fencing and get horrible tears across the front of there chests.

I lost a dog after it coursed a hare in to the front of my 4x4 and there was very little I could do to save it.

I carry QuikClot gauze with me at all times. 

These are designed to absorb all the water from blood  and leave healthy, viable tissue ready to repair once at a better medical facility.

I have attached a training video of a pig having its femoral arteries slashed in two places, simulating massive trauma.  It can be seen how effective it can be and would possibly save a dog from dying whilst your driving out of the field.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjJ0SuElqa8

I no longer use granules and only use the gauze version as it easier to manage, apply, remove and less thermogenic.

I'm a betadine user rather than chlorhex as its easier to see that I have covered the wound area better. Plus I get it on tap  Wink

Wishing you well,

Regards,

Nik

  

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