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Very Hot Topic (More than 100 Replies) When seeking shooting permission (Read 45665 times)
rabbiter
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When seeking shooting permission
Aug 19th, 2009 at 9:03pm
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1.Don't roll up to the door looking like rambo
2. Pick the right time of day ,not right in the middle of meal time.
3.Ask first could you spare me a few mintues of your time ,as at times cockys are very busy ,and nothing turns them off quicker than you standing there wanting to have a great narn up & they are flat out .
4.When driving up to his house DON"T roll right up to the door like you own the place ,stop back at bit but IN FULL view ,so he gets abit of a look at you before you get to the door .
5.A bit of small talk can help to break the ice ,weather ,lamb prices ,hows the grass growing etc.
6.If you get a yes to have a shot ,make sure you get permission for a mate as well if you are planing on taking one ,also find out where he DOESN"T want you to go .
7.Get a few clear picture on what pests he wishes you to shoot ,and whats non target ,as each farmer will have a different wish .
8.If you damage something ,you can't turn back the clock ,what you do from that point on is what matters ,so do the right thing & front up ,the damage WON'T go un noticed.
9.I find, if you arn't going to let the neighbours know you are next door shooting ,STAY well away from the boundarys .Best not to upset them  because if they ring the farmer complaining ,hes not going to fall out with them ,hes going to rag your ass.
10.Find out generally whats happening on farms around that area at that time of the year ,rolling up asking to go shooting after lambing ,right in the middle of lambing ,just isn't a great idea ,hes flat out & he will just not be very interested in thinking about you & your wishes .
11.Stay well away from any farm buildings or sheds ,farmers hate to see people hanging or poking about their sheds .
12.I do from time to time drop a feed of fish off to the stations I go pighunting on,its only a small thing ,but it lets the farmer know that I'm very happy to be able to enjoy his place .
I'm sure there are others on here that can add a few more good pointers to getting in the gate ,but above all you as the party leader carry the bag if anyone does anything wrong ,so pick your mates....carefully ...
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #1 - Aug 19th, 2009 at 9:14pm
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A sunday morning not a good time to roll up to a farmers gate,generally family time ,sleep in time ,book work time etc.Just my thoughts.
  

Shot a few deer,caugth some big trout and salmon
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #2 - Aug 19th, 2009 at 9:20pm
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Good thread! We had some wankers show up when we lived up the Waipara gorge, I got a knock on the door at 10 o'clock at night once. Also make sure you drop him off a cake or a dozen on the way out and offer him a bunny for the cat. Lately I have been struggling for places to hunt but I chop an hours worth of firewood for my main farm each time I go.

If all else fails head to the local and chat up the bird who looks like her old man has a farm.
  

.22-250Rem Perfect for rabbits to reds
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #3 - Aug 19th, 2009 at 10:29pm
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.22-250 Everything wrote on Aug 19th, 2009 at 9:20pm:
If all else fails head to the local and chat up the bird who looks like her old man has a farm.


That doesn't work if you have Shandy in tow.

You know how some guys are chick magnets?

Well, let's just say that if females were sharks, you could bottle Shandy and sell him to shipwrecked sailors...

Wink
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #4 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 12:24am
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great idea for a thread i think alot of people could use this

manners  manners manners
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #5 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 1:24am
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Good thread rabbiter

It pays the confirm with the farmer where the boundarys to the farm is. He may even have a map for you to look at because the neighbours is just a fence away and they don't take kindly to hunters on their property without permission.
  
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Reply #6 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 1:45am
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And for all those bloody foreigners here - bring a kiwi mate to do the talking and keep your mouth shut until the permission is granted.

Works for me Smiley

  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #7 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 3:43am
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great advice rabbiter, also, if your taking dogs, reassure the cocky that it has the right vacinations and is fully stock proof.
keep an eye out for any stock in trouble etc and let the cocky know.
report signs of other hunters, potential poachers etc as you dont want to get blamed for there actions if they do something wrong, had first hand experiance of this twice!
if you ring to ask permission to go for a hunt and the cockys not home, dont leave a message and go anyway unless you know him very well and its ok to do so.
dont drive through wet paddocks etc and make a mess to save your self a bit of walking, also dont drive anywere you might get stuck, walking back to ask the cocky to tow you out is a hassle for him and not likely to instill confidance in you.
an offer to come and control a few possums/rabbits/pests go's a long way.
if you get a turn down, be polite, thank him for his time and call back in a few months, just say you were passing and thought you would drop in to see if he had reconsidered, i picked up a good pheasant property on the third visit.
if you have kids that are into hunting, take them and introduce them to the cocky, saying you are looking for somewere safe to take the kids for a bit of outdoor education, cockys wives love that one! Wink
phone them after the hunt to let them know how you got on, what you saw etc,
above all, respect the property and its owners, give at least as much as you take and you will be welcome back.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #8 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 4:40am
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  • Ask what calibre gun he is happy with. A lot of farmers are happy with .22, but might not be so keen on having his farm sound like Iraq with a .308!!!

  • As rabbiter said: If your a fisherman take the farmer a feed of fish on your return visit, or if you are a pig/deer hunter take him a back leg or some veni steak

  • May-August - farmers are break-feeding, ask where this is happening and if he would like you to stay a paddock back from this (as some stock are not great behind a wire to start with and will break out causing the farmer a headache in morning)

  • DONT drive on freshly drilled/sown paddocks, keep away from them until they have been grazed (unless the farmer asks you to shoot the paddocks to get rid of those rabbits!)

  • During summer, if you see any minor water leaks (soggy green patches) - report these ASAP to the farmer - he may already know about it or it might not even be a broken water pipe. But if you advise him it could SOLVE a lot of headaches for the farmer if hes on creek water that is running out
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #9 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 6:44am
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Some very good posts coming up now ,some good old common sence is generally a good idea if it doesn't sound like a good idea then its most likely not ,a view that will be shared by the farmer .
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #10 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 8:49am
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if going spotlighting work out likly spots and shooting angles, location of back stops etc in the day time.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #11 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 11:45am
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All good ideas.Another i used to practise was keeping an eye on stock in passing and if anything didcrop up getting back to the cocky pronto with all the details.a couple of times unfortunately i had to put a coup[le of very sick sheep down but the cocky was appreciative of our actions.Iguess above all it boils down to respect and not abusing a gift eh.tube.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #12 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 12:27pm
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One time I interupted my fishing and went all the way back to the farm house to report that a horse was caught up in the fence and struggling to free it self.

I knew the farmer would appreciate my efforts and rush to the aid of his equine friend.

Whe I got the the farm house and told the farmer he turned around and yelled down the hall way to his wife. "get my gun wife, that f**king mare is stuck in the f**king fence again."
"Thanks for telling me mate, I've been wanting to get rid of that f**ker for ages and now i've got an excuse".  Shocked
  

Hunting wild animals on Department of Conservation administered land during the hours of darkness (½ hour after sunset to ½ hour before sunrise) is prohibited.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #13 - Aug 20th, 2009 at 7:59pm
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Grunt Futtick wrote on Aug 20th, 2009 at 12:27pm:
One time I interupted my fishing and went all the way back to the farm house to report that a horse was caught up in the fence and struggling to free it self.

I knew the farmer would appreciate my efforts and rush to the aid of his equine friend.

Whe I got the the farm house and told the farmer he turned around and yelled down the hall way to his wife. "get my gun wife, that f*cking mare is stuck in the f*cking fence again."
"Thanks for telling me mate, I've been wanting to get rid of that f*cker for ages and now i've got an excuse".  Shocked

So he shot the wife? Grin Grin Grin Grin
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #14 - Aug 26th, 2009 at 5:25am
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Also when you are talking to the farmers always ask where his/her stock is so you can avoid shooting in that direction or area. Even better ask for a farm map as most paddocks these days are numbered. I am lucky that the farm I shoot on I used to work there so I know the place like the back of my hand. Also if you have a suppressed centrefire it is good to say that you do have a high powered rifle with you but it is suppressed to sound like a .22 and generally they will be happy with that.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #15 - Aug 27th, 2009 at 9:10pm
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All very good ideas guys ,here another that I had forgotten
If you planing on a spotlighting trip on the farm ALWAYS ask if they have any horses on the place as they just HATE the light placed on them ,they generally go mad & could  run into a fence & be badly damage  ,so don't do ,having to go back and report that you have driven the wife or kids pet horse into barbwire ,just isn't going to go down well at all.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #16 - Aug 28th, 2009 at 12:05am
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My mate's family just bought a farm at far auckland
But we have no idea whether we can shoot or not
Is there any laws or requirements that rule out if you wanna shoot in the farm the farm must have a certain size or bigger than that??
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #17 - Aug 28th, 2009 at 12:12am
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If your out bunny shooting you are BUNNY SHOOTING the deer or porker that walks out 30 yards infront is not yours to shoot
  

.22-250Rem Perfect for rabbits to reds
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #18 - Aug 28th, 2009 at 12:18am
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Quote:
My mate's family just bought a farm at far auckland
But we have no idea whether we can shoot or not
Is there any laws or requirements that rule out if you wanna shoot in the farm the farm must have a certain size or bigger than that??


Just follow the rules as above but if its small:
Notify neighbours and ask if they have any concerns
Notify Police if its close to a township
and check where the buildings/houses are

Even a few farms I do occasionally, at night the place looks different, and even if i know a house is in a certain direction, sometimes you have to lift the spotlight off the animal and shine around and check where the house is before taking a shot. If not 100% sure dont take the shot!!
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #19 - Aug 28th, 2009 at 12:18am
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.22-250 Everything wrote on Aug 28th, 2009 at 12:12am:
If your out bunny shooting you are BUNNY SHOOTING the deer or porker that walks out 30 yards infront is not yours to shoot


If you have asked the farmer if it is ok to shoot them Smiley

He may have a few he is leaving to build the numbers to maintain stocks as it is easy to wipe satalite heards out Wink
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #20 - Aug 28th, 2009 at 12:40am
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Quote:
If you have asked the farmer if it is ok to shoot them

He may have a few he is leaving to build the numbers to maintain stocks as it is easy to wipe satalite heards out


Yes and it doesnt hurt to ask!

The reason i put this in is on our old farm we had four fallow deer turn up unexpected and I left them alone for about a year hoping a few more would establish. we let a fella who had been begging to shoot bunnies go out for a walk and he came back with a HUGE smile saying he had shot two small deer, both hinds and could we come and help him carry them. Angry Angry Angry

The old man told him in no uncertain terms that he could come help US carry them, he might get a front shoulder if he is lucky and not to bother calling in again.
  

.22-250Rem Perfect for rabbits to reds
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #21 - Aug 28th, 2009 at 1:40am
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Same goes for stoats, ferrits and cats.

Most land owners want them shot.  Some of the more old school ones want them left (they eat rabbits after all).  You won't know until you ask.
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #22 - Aug 31st, 2009 at 10:00am
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All good stuff guys.
All common sense, and thats all anyone can ask for.
People are more likely to allow good people that are known to be good people keep coming back. So if given the opportunity for some shooting on someones land, make a good impression.
Remember also, there are alot of land owners that themselves like to hunt so don't be dissappointed or discouraged if you get turned down, you may one day be invited to join them if a good impression is made.
Just my 2 cents.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #23 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 4:40am
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helps if you say you belong to deerstalkers or a local hunting clubs.  deerstalkers is great as they have a $10m public liability insurance in case something goes horribly wrong.
  

For some of us, the call to hunt is deep in our genes.  It's there, and those that don't have it will never know the deep and profound impact is has upon those of us who do.  Keith Draper.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #24 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 4:56am
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Chief wrote on Sep 7th, 2009 at 4:40am:
helps if you say you belong to deerstalkers or a local hunting clubs.  deerstalkers is great as they have a $10m public liability insurance in case something goes horribly wrong.


I'm asuming that only covers Public land though wouldnt it??

If its not the case, I might just join and cancel my insurances, but does it cover Rural Fire?
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #25 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 4:59am
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ah shit my bad rabbit hunter.  you're completely right.  it does only cover public land.  yep it does cover rural fire, but only on public land.  guess what i was trying to say was that if you belong to a club, the cocky is more likely to see you in a positive light and involved in the sport, rather than being a rambo Smiley
  

For some of us, the call to hunt is deep in our genes.  It's there, and those that don't have it will never know the deep and profound impact is has upon those of us who do.  Keith Draper.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #26 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 5:02am
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Chief wrote on Sep 7th, 2009 at 4:59am:
ah shit my bad rabbit hunter.  you're completely right.  it does only cover public land.  yep it does cover rural fire, but only on public land.


Are you sure?  Huh
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #27 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 5:05am
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off my old membership card.... "members have $10m public liability insurance, including a $1m forest and rural fires act extension, and a punitive and exemplary damage cover against claims made from hunting activities in the field".  fairly else non specific i guess - am now wondering if it is on all land and not just public?  can anyone else shed some light?
  

For some of us, the call to hunt is deep in our genes.  It's there, and those that don't have it will never know the deep and profound impact is has upon those of us who do.  Keith Draper.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #28 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 5:07am
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How much is a yearly membership to NZDA?? Will be WAY cheaper than what I pay for the insurance I need
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #29 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 5:08am
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I'd assumed it was for anywhere, as our Branch uses it to get access through private forest to public land.
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #30 - Sep 7th, 2009 at 5:10am
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think it was $90 for a full year senior membership.  you get 10% off at h&f too Smiley
  

For some of us, the call to hunt is deep in our genes.  It's there, and those that don't have it will never know the deep and profound impact is has upon those of us who do.  Keith Draper.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #31 - Sep 9th, 2009 at 8:31pm
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great post rabbiter ;
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #32 - Sep 18th, 2009 at 6:53pm
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really good idea for a post, rabbiter. too many idiots out there that are givin us a bad name
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #33 - Sep 19th, 2009 at 10:00pm
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Another few things that were mentioned to me from a farmer who has just contracted me to shoot his rabbits:

He doesnt want to know "oh about 40 rabbits" he wants to know exactually how many rabbits, so count properly and let him know

And he was brassed off at people taking pop shots at rabbits with no or very little chance of hitting them. He was sick of watching the rabbit shooters taking 100mtr shots with their .22 and missing. And now they are toey!!
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #34 - Sep 27th, 2009 at 1:04am
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Hey Guys, ive always found helping out the the farmer always works for me and my father, we a both fortunate to work for bakeries, and i tell you cockies are always great full when you offer them bread to say thanks!

  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #35 - Sep 27th, 2009 at 2:03am
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Yup. Dropped off 2 bottles of nice wine to my local farmer the other day as a way of saying thanks for letting us shoot. A little bit of effort goes a long way, and that's why we're going back tonight  Wink
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #36 - Sep 27th, 2009 at 10:30am
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Advice from a 'bloody foreigner'.
I have enough land in the UK to keep me busy now, but when i didn't i started by being in the right place at the right time, what i mean by that is study the local farmers habits, then make sure when he is on his rounds he spots you looking at his land from the public highway, he is bound to enquire what you are looking at, hey presto first contact! Worked for me when i started out, cheeky but hey all is fair in love and war.
In my experinec word of mouth is the best recommendation a landowner can have.
We also used to leave the tail of any fox we shot as evidence, and always keep them sweet at Christmas with a bottle of the good stuff.
Cheers
Richard
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #37 - Sep 29th, 2009 at 10:52pm
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Good post! I have only been told no once and that was because his kids hunted the farm. Politeness is the key and a promise to leave the place in the same condition you found it. I find a lot of farmers dont want meat or booze so I have a friend with bees so four or five pounds of honey sweetens up most people.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #38 - Oct 7th, 2009 at 3:57am
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Has anyone tried putting a flyer in the farmers letterbox ? Much success with that ?
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #39 - Oct 7th, 2009 at 5:00am
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6possums wrote on Oct 7th, 2009 at 3:57am:
Has anyone tried putting a flyer in the farmers letterbox ? Much success with that ?


LOL!!

As it happens, I am working on one of those!

With a stamped, self addressed, pre-completed "yes / no" type response sheet to make it easier for them!

Cheesy
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #40 - Oct 7th, 2009 at 5:06am
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BTMO wrote on Oct 7th, 2009 at 5:00am:
6possums wrote on Oct 7th, 2009 at 3:57am:
Has anyone tried putting a flyer in the farmers letterbox ? Much success with that ?


LOL!!

As it happens, I am working on one of those!

With a stamped, self addressed, pre-completed "yes / no" type response sheet to make it easier for them!

Cheesy


Don't think you will get much response. Do you know how much crap farmers/rural people get in their letter box???

If your going to drive to the property, why not just call in and ask, at least then they get to meet the person that wants to shoot there.
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #41 - Oct 7th, 2009 at 5:10am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Oct 7th, 2009 at 5:06am:
If you're going to drive to the property, why not just call in and ask, at least then they get to meet the person that wants to shoot there.


^^^ Exactly, and on a related note, if you are going from farm to farm - remember to pay attention to what sort of farm it is(ie Dairy), now that daylight savings are upon us, what you may think is early evening could well be right on bedtime for some folk!
  

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Reply #42 - Oct 7th, 2009 at 9:05am
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BTMO wrote on Oct 7th, 2009 at 5:00am:
6possums wrote on Oct 7th, 2009 at 3:57am:
Has anyone tried putting a flyer in the farmers letterbox ? Much success with that ?


LOL!!

As it happens, I am working on one of those!

With a stamped, self addressed, pre-completed "yes / no" type response sheet to make it easier for them!

Cheesy

Been there, done that, waste of time and money.
Cheers
Richard
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #43 - Oct 7th, 2009 at 10:35am
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Yep, I know it is a gamble - just like door knocking is, or cold phone calling.

Personally, I find all sorts of begging letters, phone calls but most especially people knocking on my door annoying. Especially if it is my day off.

However, I think it is worth at least trying. It is no more a waste of money / time than knocking on a door where you get told "no".
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #44 - Oct 15th, 2009 at 6:44am
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All good stuff. One rule i alway use is leave gates as you find them. When shooting on small farms and you let the neighbours now your there they sometimes let you shoot there place also Wink
  
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Reply #45 - Oct 21st, 2009 at 9:30am
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one time when i went up the bush, my cousin told me that hunters would sneek up there take some deer and try and sneek out, when my aunty asked them what they were up to they said "oh we were coming to bring u some deer we shot" and cut her of just enough for a sandwich Angrycheeky man really cheeky, she had her grandkids with her aswell, and it was private land,. also if theyd shot tooo much deer theyd just leave the carcasses behind, that is really not kool. isnt that animal cruelty, kill for fun.  its all about the respect of the land and the people that own it, and the animals. i believe that 200% this thread is awesome especially to bring to mind things like respect to idiots that disrespect it all. a BIG THUMBS UP^^^
  
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Reply #46 - Oct 25th, 2009 at 8:14am
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Once you have permission or are seeking permission give the farmer a hand with docking and other busy times of year. always gets you in the good books in my experience
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #47 - Nov 4th, 2009 at 12:06am
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Drove past a property last night about 6.30 or 7pm and just off the road in a field the grass was dotted with bunnies just catching the last bit if strong sunlight - must have been about 15 ! - thts the most ive seen around here so think ill try and get onto that property now ! Might try the stamped self addressed envelope first although im a bit impatient now so might even try the drive in and walk up too!
  
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Reply #48 - Nov 4th, 2009 at 1:25am
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I used to be plucky at this and I had a lot of luck.

Been said already but get a kid. Doesnt have to be yours, any kid will do. The less annoying the better. Some might argue it benefits the kid, gets them into hunting etc, but in my case its pure exploitation. They are also useful for handing you ammunition.

If they have a rabbit problem or not, as has been said already shoot to kill. If you think a shots off then dont take it. I had a guy shooting on my place and he stuffed it. He shot at every rabbit on the property but Im not sure he ever hit any. They were all cagey and frustrating after that.

Be very clear about what on the hit list and what isnt. Each farmer has his own quirks and often his own pets and quite often he will be embarassed to tell you. Ask "are there any you want left alone" in case he likes seeing some of them. For some farmers the wildlife they see around their property each day is half he fun. Some like cats, some like birds. If you shot a hawk on my place, my old man might shoot you. I know another guy who would give you his daughter in exchange for a dead hawk (has chickens).

I guess the main thing is be sensitive to what they are about and dont make assumptions based on what people normally think. One persons pest is anothers pet.

I like Rabbiters No.9. I had one farmer who said when I turned up to shoot "theres bugger all on my place, just go where ever you like and if anyone hits you up, just tell him you thought you were on Bills place" Grin
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #49 - Nov 4th, 2009 at 1:40am
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Quote:
I



Be very clear about what on the hit list and what isnt.



One place I shot on hares where off limits as she liked to see them Wink

Pitty she sold that part of the farm as it was 5min away from me and had deer I was to shoot if seen.

Another had a black ribbit that lived under the pump shed that was to be left

ALLWAYS CHECK Wink
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #50 - Dec 30th, 2009 at 7:41am
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North Canterbury and possibly other parts of NZ.

There is a lot of long grass about on the hill blocks.
I would suggest getting Rural Forest & Fire Insurance, either as a name on your parents policy or getting your own. Its not cheap but if you can show the farmer your insurance certificate he may be more willing to let you on.

I have spoken with a few farmers up here and they are CONCERNED this year about MAJOR fires happening on their property. Just looking out window to the rain guage looks like another 15-20mm of rain today but that will soon dry out and the long grass still turn to fire litter and burning quickly
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #51 - Jan 2nd, 2010 at 3:37am
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Something else I just thought of is, don't rock up to the door with a truck full of "rambo lookalikes" limit your party to a couple of mates at most & make sure you clear them with farmer,remember if they step out of line while they are there ,you will be in the firing line as well, so choose them very carefully.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #52 - Jan 20th, 2010 at 3:03am
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Also another couple of VERY important questions to ask the farmer.

1. How big is your property?, his answer will dictate your following response. If he say's 10,000 acres then follow on with question 2.

2. Do you have a daughter, explain that you dont care if she is fat or ugly.

3. Would she like to come for a shot and show me around.

4. Do you have a bad cough? high Blood pressure?
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #53 - Jan 20th, 2010 at 3:06am
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[quote author=rick link=1250715839/45#52 date=1263956599]Also another couple of VERY important questions to ask the farmer.

2. Do you have a daughter, explain that you dont care if she is fat or ugly.
[quote]

Speaking from experience Rick?    Grin Grin
  

For some of us, the call to hunt is deep in our genes.  It's there, and those that don't have it will never know the deep and profound impact is has upon those of us who do.  Keith Draper.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #54 - Jan 20th, 2010 at 8:05pm
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Yep, the plan was to get in the door and then flick fatty off but unfortunatly the farm wasnt big enough to split in half Grin Grin

so i bailed
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #55 - Jan 20th, 2010 at 9:28pm
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Rick has covered off a few of the essentials, but other helpful advice that is sure to see you impress the farmer

1. dress in nazi regalia and goose step wherever you walk
2. stop halfway up his driveway in full view, and start glassing before even talking to him
3. talk directly to his wifes tits when asking if 'da man' is home
  

Full tit. Nothing else.
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #56 - Jan 24th, 2010 at 1:05am
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Its probably been covered before. But if you are told to stay out of an area. MAKE SURE YOU BLOODY DO!!!

Just witnessed people being in where they shouldn't be. I'm pretty sure the farmer would have told them, Can't confirm that tho. But it has now stuffed up an extensive & very important 2 year plan.
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #57 - Jan 26th, 2010 at 3:12am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jan 24th, 2010 at 1:05am:
Its probably been covered before. But if you are told to stay out of an area. MAKE SURE YOU BLOODY DO!!!

Just witnessed people being in where they shouldn't be. I'm pretty sure the farmer would have told them, Can't confirm that tho. But it has now stuffed up an extensive & very important 2 year plan.

After I first get permission ,the second job I try to do is to get EVERYBODY else that shoots kicked off the place ,bloody townies  & their bloody problems ,no wonder I enjoy working with the dogs most days . Grin
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #58 - Jan 26th, 2010 at 3:34pm
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rabbiter wrote on Jan 26th, 2010 at 3:12am:
ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jan 24th, 2010 at 1:05am:
Its probably been covered before. But if you are told to stay out of an area. MAKE SURE YOU BLOODY DO!!!

Just witnessed people being in where they shouldn't be. I'm pretty sure the farmer would have told them, Can't confirm that tho. But it has now stuffed up an extensive & very important 2 year plan.

After I first get permission ,the second job I try to do is to get EVERYBODY else that shoots kicked off the place ,bloody townies  & their bloody problems ,no wonder I enjoy working with the dogs most days . Grin

"kicked off" is almost too strong a term ,but generally I get anyother shooting stopped as it will have a effect on how many I might get & how long it will take to get the rabbits under control & time is after all money .
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #59 - Jan 26th, 2010 at 7:32pm
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rabbiter wrote on Jan 26th, 2010 at 3:34pm:
rabbiter wrote on Jan 26th, 2010 at 3:12am:
ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jan 24th, 2010 at 1:05am:
Its probably been covered before. But if you are told to stay out of an area. MAKE SURE YOU BLOODY DO!!!

Just witnessed people being in where they shouldn't be. I'm pretty sure the farmer would have told them, Can't confirm that tho. But it has now stuffed up an extensive & very important 2 year plan.

After I first get permission ,the second job I try to do is to get EVERYBODY else that shoots kicked off the place ,bloody townies  & their bloody problems ,no wonder I enjoy working with the dogs most days . Grin

"kicked off" is almost too strong a term ,but generally I get anyother shooting stopped as it will have a effect on how many I might get & how long it will take to get the rabbits under control & time is after all money .


Yeah lets just say this group wont be back as they were shown where not to go.

Sadly he isnt getting me up there shooting, just arranging poisoning plans. I have spoken with the other group who goes shooting up there (members of this forum) and im certain they wont go in any out of bounds areas.

But yes if I was being paid to shoot rabbits on a property I instruct the farmer that any calls for access to shoot on the farm have to call me for permission first. And unless I know them and take them out the answer is no.
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #60 - Jan 27th, 2010 at 5:43am
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I always  Grin when afterI tell the farmer ,please don't shoot at any rabbits between my visits till I get things under control, he gos on to tell me his son is a dead keen shooter/hunter ,my reply is always the same ,if god rings you wanting to come for a shot ,its in your best interests to turn him away ....in the meantime. Grin
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #61 - Feb 6th, 2010 at 9:32pm
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Some great advice on here. I went out after wallabies on a guys place  first time i had shot there and before we went out he said there are a few deer running around but dont go and shoot them all because he did like seeing them. We saw about 15 that night but didnt shoot one as only saw hinds and being november not the best time to shoot hinds. He respected the fact that we were responsibe hunters and has invited us back to shoot one early this year. Bit of respect goes a long way.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #62 - Jun 4th, 2010 at 8:35am
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One thing I have to say.

Is dont be offended if the farmer lets another shooter onto what you think is "your" land. Remember the farmer is trying to control a pest. You will be allowed on there if you respect the property. But if you are slow at booking, eg ring on the Thursday night for a Friday night shoot, you may be too late.

Also remember that occasionally farmers need to use professionals or do poison operations, which 2/10 you will be refused access until that is finished (unless its a large farm and you can shoot elsewhere on it). Dont be offended if this happens, as farmers have REQUIREMENTS to control rabbits to the acceptance of the Regional Council. Or they can face imprisonment, fines and/or have the work done for him/her.
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #63 - Dec 23rd, 2010 at 7:02pm
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Just thought I'd throw this in here.

Delivering my Xmas presents to clients. Dropped off a bottle of local-made wine to a farm owner (who I NEVER deal with, only deal with the manager), well he was STOKED to get a "little" something for all the $$$ he's dished out.

So people, even though it might cost you a $10-$25 for a bottle of wine or 12pack of beer and a trip to the farm, its well worth it as a thankyou xmas present.

A lot of farmers hate accepting gifts, but if they dont, just leave in his/her mailbox on the way out

Its prob to late for this year, but remember next year!
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #64 - Dec 23rd, 2010 at 8:26pm
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Yup, done the same. A bottle of wine and a thank you goes a long way.
  
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Reply #65 - Feb 13th, 2011 at 1:03am
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When you have found a patch to shoot, remember that the farmer might possibly not wanting you to call him EVERY week for a friday night shoot. You can easily overstay your welcome. Particularly if he likes to have a bit of a shoot himself (I had a mate that got a bit overzealous and cost us a primo bunny shooting spot).
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #66 - Feb 17th, 2011 at 7:52pm
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My 2cents from the other side of the fence. I get pretty pissed off when a truck load of people would turn up wanting to shoot there & then. I would recomend approaching farmer prior to wanting to shoot (of course take your rifle along cos we are all different) & go by yourself the 1st couple of times. Most farmers ya gota earn their trust.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #67 - Feb 17th, 2011 at 8:02pm
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Yup that's the basic advice given on the 1st post.

Visit without your gear, at a suitable time, have a chat, check the lay of the land. Turning up by the truck load =  Angry
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #68 - Feb 17th, 2011 at 10:44pm
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My biggest client had a "rabbiter" turn up last week, he asked the farmer if she could stay in his caravan and spend a few weeks onsite shooting them.

He then proceeded to tell the farmer the only way to get rid of the rabbits was shooting, not poison....

Farmer laughed his head off, he'd spent 5 years with a full time live in rabbiter and the numbers were still skyrocketting, so decided to cut down on the shooting and poison
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #69 - Mar 10th, 2011 at 2:37am
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I'm looking for somewhere to shoot around Christchurch, if anyone knows someone to contact or can take me out with them - it would be much appreciated.

I'm not looking for a contract or money, just to get out and hopefully shoot some bunnies without having to drive for hours - or pay to use a range whenever I want a shoot.

Someone mentioned F&G may have farmers looking for assistance?
I guess being a 'casual' shooter, I'd have to make sure they realize I'm not an idiot who will shoot stock etc.

Cheers!
  

Whatungarongaro te tangata toitū te whenua
Man shall disappear, but the land always remains
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #70 - Apr 18th, 2011 at 6:26am
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if you plan on hunting witha dog alot of farmers apricate or even require the practice of you turning up with a dosing certificate to prove you dog is wormed. makes you seem responsible and on the farmers side to begin with. dosnt cost anythng. especialy the high country old school types. as for a bottle of plonk id say its a must every now and then. espicaly if you stay in a station hutect Smiley
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #71 - May 13th, 2011 at 10:44am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Sep 19th, 2009 at 10:00pm:
He was sick of watching the rabbit shooters taking 100mtr shots with their .22 and missing. And now they are toey!!


I've had this experience with farmers too. Most rabbits seem to know what the effective range of a .22LR is in the heavily shot areas. I got a .17HMR and never looked back.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #72 - Jun 16th, 2011 at 7:55am
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just got a nice spot here in the wairarapa, real down to earth farmer and always good for a yarn even tho i never met the chap! rang him up saying im a learning shepherd and a decent crutcher/shearer and just full belly crutched all his ewes for free. that got me some biiig browny points which is nice considering theres a few fallow deer and a good population of goats which he's deemed to me as open season on both.
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #73 - Jun 29th, 2011 at 12:17am
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dtchch wrote on Mar 10th, 2011 at 2:37am:
I'm looking for somewhere to shoot around Christchurch, if anyone knows someone to contact or can take me out with them - it would be much appreciated.

I'm not looking for a contract or money, just to get out and hopefully shoot some bunnies without having to drive for hours - or pay to use a range whenever I want a shoot.

Someone mentioned F&G may have farmers looking for assistance?
I guess being a 'casual' shooter, I'd have to make sure they realize I'm not an idiot who will shoot stock etc.

Cheers!


It's bloody hard. Two many 10acre blocks going up. Flat ground is dangerous, so properties with riverbeds and hills are the places to look.

One space i got on to has bugger all bunnies and I've eradicated the hares in 2 visits. F&G aren't any help.

  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #74 - May 5th, 2012 at 11:25am
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I like to drop in and talk to them about boundaries and livestock (I also give there dogs the rabbits), and a few beers go along way  Wink
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #75 - Dec 15th, 2012 at 5:31am
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Its that time of the year when people are out and about after lambing/calving looking for land to shoot.

Thought I would bump into this old thread so the newbies an read it page for page. Us old timers put in a lot of good information on this thread.

Happy searching and Hunting!!
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #76 - Dec 18th, 2012 at 7:10am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Dec 15th, 2012 at 5:31am:
Its that time of the year when people are out and about after lambing/calving looking for land to shoot.

Thought I would bump into this old thread so the newbies an read it page for page. Us old timers put in a lot of good information on this thread.

Happy searching and Hunting!!


Yep there have been a heap of posts recently by people looking for properties...

All I can say I have found this thread was GOLD when I was looking for a bit of confidence to go door-knocking and now have some awesome shooting available.

Good luck!
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #77 - Feb 4th, 2013 at 2:56am
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As a land owner I agree with a lot of this, a gift or token of appreciation goes a Hec of a long way.

Interestingly when I commented on a thread on deer hunting locations and access suggesting that when one strolls up out of the blue it doesn't hurt to "come bearing gifts" the very idea got shot down by a number of members with comments reeking of self entitlement thinking that no one should have to pay or give anything to carry a firearm and shoot game on a farmers back lawn??

Goodness knows they won't be getting access anytime soon.

It's encouraging to see a decent attitude developing here and very telling to hear the practice of those members which have gained the trust of landowners.
It's not what you give or offer to give but rather the attitude behind it  Wink

  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #78 - Feb 4th, 2013 at 5:08am
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My son and I had a great few days before xmas on a big central Otago property. I gave the owners wife a couple of bottles of the local vino and had to really persuade her that it is the way I do things. I would feel really guilty if she hadnt accepted such a small token for such great sport.
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #79 - Feb 4th, 2013 at 6:22am
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Cockies who give me permission grt something every year. To start with a couple took  some convincibg.
It was made easier when i explained that was how i had been educated into shooting / hunting private land.
Whether a bottle of whisky a few brace of pheasants, whatever.
Simply put i was taught it was good manners and a small gesture for what could be life long access and sport.

People can label it what they like, i just think its bloody good manners and shows respect, its a great basis to establish long lasting friendships / relationships
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #80 - May 12th, 2013 at 10:45pm
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I was talking to a cocky on opening day, he was feeding his horses. I was coming home from a dive.
I asked how opening went. He thought I wanted to shoot his pond so was a bit cagy.
I gave him a cray and a couple of paua and asked about rabbit shooting. Got told to help myself, just text him first.
He asked I leave the deer and pigs alone for now. I will respect that.

He even showed me the 100 acres that are 'mine' until I show him I can be let over the rest of his farm. 2pm we saw quite a few rabbits.

Im stoked.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #81 - May 15th, 2013 at 5:38am
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Good on you, well done. Its all in the first impressions eh.

If you arrive staunch and a "know it all", you will get laughed off pretty quick.

Farmers maybe at times be called stupid country folk, but trust me they are very intelligent businessmen/women. They know an A##e##le from a good bugger from that very first chat!!

Arrive with a good manner, accept being told no (there are millions of reasons).

Its like asking a chick out on a date, your not going to win them all.... Grin Grin
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #82 - May 15th, 2013 at 6:06am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on May 15th, 2013 at 5:38am:
Its like asking a chick out on a date, your not going to win them all.... Grin Grin


Grin Great way of putting it ... have to accept rejection gracefully!
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #83 - May 15th, 2013 at 6:09am
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Chris B wrote on May 15th, 2013 at 6:06am:
Grin Great way of putting it ... have to accept rejection gracefully!


It does piss ya off at times though especially when shes a "great bit of land"! Cheesy Cheesy
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #84 - Jul 25th, 2013 at 6:49am
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rabbiter wrote on Aug 19th, 2009 at 9:03pm:
1.Don't roll up to the door looking like rambo
2. Pick the right time of day ,not right in the middle of meal time.
3.Ask first could you spare me a few mintues of your time ,as at times cockys are very busy ,and nothing turns them off quicker than you standing there wanting to have a great narn up & they are flat out .
4.When driving up to his house DON"T roll right up to the door like you own the place ,stop back at bit but IN FULL view ,so he gets abit of a look at you before you get to the door .
5.A bit of small talk can help to break the ice ,weather ,lamb prices ,hows the grass growing etc.
6.If you get a yes to have a shot ,make sure you get permission for a mate as well if you are planing on taking one ,also find out where he DOESN"T want you to go .
7.Get a few clear picture on what pests he wishes you to shoot ,and whats non target ,as each farmer will have a different wish .
8.If you damage something ,you can't turn back the clock ,what you do from that point on is what matters ,so do the right thing & front up ,the damage WON'T go un noticed.
9.I find, if you arn't going to let the neighbours know you are next door shooting ,STAY well away from the boundarys .Best not to upset them  because if they ring the farmer complaining ,hes not going to fall out with them ,hes going to rag your ass.
10.Find out generally whats happening on farms around that area at that time of the year ,rolling up asking to go shooting after lambing ,right in the middle of lambing ,just isn't a great idea ,hes flat out & he will just not be very interested in thinking about you & your wishes .
11.Stay well away from any farm buildings or sheds ,farmers hate to see people hanging or poking about their sheds .
12.I do from time to time drop a feed of fish off to the stations I go pighunting on,its only a small thing ,but it lets the farmer know that I'm very happy to be able to enjoy his place .
I'm sure there are others on here that can add a few more good pointers to getting in the gate ,but above all you as the party leader carry the bag if anyone does anything wrong ,so pick your mates....carefully ...

GREAT Advice  Smiley
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #85 - Jul 25th, 2013 at 7:10am
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seano wrote on Jul 25th, 2013 at 6:49am:
GREAT Advice  Smiley


Rabbiter always had great advice.  Sadly he got his boxers in a twist and hasn't been on since..

I know you are reading this rabbiter!!

Come back and teach the newbies, you were well liked on here. Just dont take shit from headcase or chris or Oscar!!
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #86 - Jul 26th, 2013 at 8:05am
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thanks for the tips!!
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #87 - Jul 26th, 2013 at 8:28pm
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Good result. Ive found even when you get a yes, landowners are different. One place it took me 2 yrs to build the trust, baby steps. And the farmer still wont let me night shoot without him.

At the other extreme one of my old local contacts lets me comeand go as i plese. On dqy one told me where the main gate keys were hidden if he was away for a period of days and place was locked up.

Its just a case of abiding by the ground rules they set some stricter than others. AND always respectful and responsible.
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #88 - Jul 26th, 2013 at 8:55pm
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jul 25th, 2013 at 7:10am:
Rabbiter always had great advice.  Sadly he got his boxers in a twist and hasn't been on since..

I know you are reading this rabbiter!!

Come back and teach the newbies, you were well liked on here. Just dont take shit from headcase or chris or Oscar!!


I think a wallaby ate him.  Cry
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #89 - Jul 26th, 2013 at 9:01pm
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The hills can be cruel!
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #90 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:14am
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headcase wrote on Jul 26th, 2013 at 8:55pm:
I think a wallaby ate him.  Cry

A wild pig bit me not long ago does that count ? Smiley
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #91 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:16am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jul 25th, 2013 at 7:10am:
Rabbiter always had great advice.  Sadly he got his boxers in a twist and hasn't been on since..

I know you are reading this rabbiter!!

Come back and teach the newbies, you were well liked on here. Just dont take shit from headcase or chris or Oscar!!

I do sneak in from time to time ,to check how you guys are going & I just had to smile at your post mate .
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #92 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 4:49am
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lots of great info.

Managed to pick up another farm over the weekend. Have shot there a couple of times and always let the farmer know how I get on. Was talking to him on Friday and he said "you do realise you dont have to ask everytime you want to come up, just text me so I know that you are here"
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #93 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 7:16am
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Tarrbaby wrote on Jul 30th, 2013 at 4:49am:
lots of great info.

Managed to pick up another farm over the weekend. Have shot there a couple of times and always let the farmer know how I get on. Was talking to him on Friday and he said "you do realise you dont have to ask everytime you want to come up, just text me so I know that you are here"


Congrats, those farms are worth their weight in gold. Don't forget the farmer come Xmas  Wink
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #94 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 7:46am
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rabbiter wrote on Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:16am:
I do sneak in from time to time ,to check how you guys are going & I just had to smile at your post mate .


Im in hospital recovering from my heart attack rabbiter!! Great to see you back.

I see aunty Chris got his knickers in a knot about my previous post, if he didn't take that as a bit of a joke he should maybe arrange to see Mr Kim Dotcom!

But in what was orginally said and all the following is what farmers think etc. Some of you are "townies" so need to know how country folk work, and in Rabbiters and mine and others responses will help you a lot to approach farmers.
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #95 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 9:30am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jul 30th, 2013 at 7:46am:
Im in hospital recovering from my heart attack rabbiter!! Great to see you back.

I see aunty Chris got his knickers in a knot about my previous post, if he didn't take that as a bit of a joke he should maybe arrange to see Mr Kim Dotcom!

But in what was orginally said and all the following is what farmers think etc. Some of you are "townies" so need to know how country folk work, and in Rabbiters and mine and others responses will help you a lot to approach farmers.

hey IM very sorry to hear that bad news ,hope theres no long term damage done & you make a fast recovery mate .
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #96 - Jul 30th, 2013 at 9:33am
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ex-rabbithunter wrote on Jul 30th, 2013 at 7:46am:
Im in hospital recovering from my heart attack rabbiter!! Great to see you back.

I see aunty Chris got his knickers in a knot about my previous post, if he didn't take that as a bit of a joke he should maybe arrange to see Mr Kim Dotcom!

But in what was orginally said and all the following is what farmers think etc. Some of you are "townies" so need to know how country folk work, and in Rabbiters and mine and others responses will help you a lot to approach farmers.


Some people will do anything for a bit of attention.  Cheesy

Seriously? Now youve really got me worried, guy with a life style like yours gets a heart attack.?  Tongue
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #97 - Oct 19th, 2013 at 7:41am
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Hi guys

Just wanted to drop a thank you message on here. Followed the advise outlined in this thread and secured a place to cull bunnies. Being in an area where it is a little harder to find a shooting spot, I can't be happier. Cheers
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #98 - Oct 19th, 2013 at 7:43am
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etrain wrote on Oct 19th, 2013 at 7:41am:
Hi guys

Just wanted to drop a thank you message on here. Followed the advise outlined in this thread and secured a place to cull bunnies. Being in an area where it is a little harder to find a shooting spot, I can't be happier. Cheers


Welcome to the forum, good to see the wise old buggers on here are able to pass on their knowledge
  

"the only good Wallaby is a dead one"
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #99 - Jun 11th, 2014 at 8:47pm
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And that someone is successfull applying it.---well done "Etrain" Wink
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #100 - Sep 30th, 2015 at 2:58am
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I'm getting sick of the threads.... were can I go hunting in.... add Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington etc etc etc.

  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #101 - Sep 30th, 2015 at 9:38pm
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Sad to say my first oost on here was one of those 'where can I go hunting..' Haha have since learned and have sorted myself 4 blocks to hunt on. As previously said if you shoot something let the owner know and maybe drop him off a backsteak or leg or something. I'm only 17 and one guy was a bit skeptical about givin me acess so he gave me acess for a day to see how I went.shot a deer and gave him a back leg. Know I have the keys for the gate. A little gift/ respect goes a long way
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #102 - Dec 21st, 2015 at 8:54pm
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Over the weekend I dropped off a bottle of wine, fresh baking courtesy of the missus and a card to a cocky on whose property I hunt ducks and bunnies. Merry Xmas, thanks for letting us hunt, I said. Took one of my three youngsters with me and he later asked why we give the farmer and his wife so much (we drop off fresh baking once a month or so).
'Mate', I said, 'by doing this, you're showing respect and gratitude and in doing so, possibly setting yourself up to be allowed to hunt here for the rest of your life.' He got it, and then suggested he mows their lawn !  Wink
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #103 - Dec 22nd, 2015 at 2:47am
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Asking honestly without coming on strong about how youll solve all his pest problems is the best policy.. I find it productive to just ask if there is a patch somewhere you could hone your skills on. Being humble  is always better than being arrogant.

The other thing is to shoot it alone for a while before asking if you can bring 20 MATES WITH YOU .. that doesn't usually go off to well. Grin

Glad to hear you guys are having some success.
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #104 - Dec 22nd, 2015 at 7:39am
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I had a rabbit bolt out from under a tight heap of branches today .He travelled around the back of the tractor shed and went to shoot under a small garden shed on skids .He was almost under it when I took the shot ,yep got him but blew a bit of tin off the bottom of iron just above ground level .Later the farmer arrived home ,so after he asked how had I done & all the rest of the small talk ,I took him over and pointed out the damage & said sorry ,to which he replyed " nothing major ,don't worry about that ,no real damage done ,.......did you get the rabbit ?" .Now anybody can make a mistake however its what you after you have made a boo boo is what counts ,be up front at all times .It pays in the long run ,sure in this case, he may not of noticed for days ,weeks or even years however doing the right thing is by far ALWAYS the best bet .
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #105 - Dec 13th, 2016 at 8:31pm
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as a farmer all the previous advice sounds brilliant
we often have people turn up asking to shoot

if we turn anyone down its generally because they look dodgy ie just came back from vietnam and forgot to change.
or
theres already someone who comes shooting on a regular basis

theres some good guys out there
a few years back we had a guy bring his teenage sons out to teach them to shoot (targets etc)
20mins later hes back up the house asking for help to get one of our cows out of a drain
it was much appreciated and as a consequence we handed him a 303 and told him to take his sons down the back paddock and get a deer for themselves which they did
a week later he turned up with a box of beer and a cake from his wife
they have since turned into some great friends
moral of this story is
treat any farmers place as if its your own and be helpful and who knows what may come of it.you may be pleasantly surprised
  

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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #106 - Feb 9th, 2017 at 10:30am
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Hi i live around the Wanganui area. Plenty of farmland surrounding this place. Im wondering if a letter drop would be a way to go about getting permission. or is that just to informal and most likely to find its way in the bin ? Best bet just to door knock ? Cheers for help. Tips are great
  
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Re: When seeking shooting permission
Reply #107 - Apr 16th, 2017 at 6:45pm
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Great thread this. I made up fliers and dropped them in some letterboxes asking to go for a shoot with a .22 was very suprised with the response! Now I'm flat out shootin bunnies, the dog is stoked! I wonder if it's worked so well as it's less invasive than an unexpected knock on the door? Less pressure than having to give an answer on the spot...
  
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